Honda introduced itself to the North American market in 1959, when they began selling small-displacement motorcycles out of an office in Los Angeles. Less than ten years later, Honda had sold more than one million motorcycles in the U.S. Along the way, Honda widely expanded their lineup, and helped introduce mainstream buyers to the world of motorcycling. 

By 1970, Honda introduced one of the first popular all-terrain vehicles, the Honda ATC90. A tiny three-wheeler with balloon tires, the ATC90 was powered by a 90-cc, single cylinder engine producing all of seven horsepower. It was an immediate success, and helped launch an industry. 

Today, Honda makes a full lineup of ATVs and UTVs. Two-and four-wheel-drive models are available in a wide range of configurations, from recreational and performance models to workhorses for farm and commercial use. 

On the following pages, we’ve put together the details and pricing on various models, to help you pick the best one for your needs. 

ATV vs. UTV: What’s the Difference?

Generally speaking, all-terrain vehicles – or ATVs – are smaller and more maneuverable than a utility task vehicle, or UTV. Alternatively known as a four-wheeler or quad, an ATV has four wheels and handlebars for steering. While most ATVs are designed for a single rider, some can accommodate two people in motorcycle fashion, with the passenger seated behind the rider and both straddling the engine. Most manufacturers offer ATVs designed for recreation, sport, or work. 

UTVs can seat anywhere from two to six people, depending on configuration. Many have more storage than an ATV, with a pickup-like bed or even a dump box behind the seats. Many UTVs include a complete roll cage, windshield, and even a complete cab and doors. Seating is more car-like, with one, two, or three rows of seating, and a steering wheel and pedals for the driver. 

There are exceptions, of course, and some ATVs have racks or small beds for carrying gear. Alternatively, some ATVs and UTVs are set up for performance rather than work. Some recreation and utility models can be equipped with a trailer for additional carrying capacity. 

Many ATVs will fit in the back of a pickup truck, something that can’t be said for most UTVs. Determining whether an ATV or UTV is best for you, and picking a specific model, will depend on your priorities, needs, and budget. 

Types of Honda ATVs and UTVs

Honda breaks their ATV lineup down into Rec/Utility and Sport models, with either rear or all-wheel drive. A total of five Rec/Sport models are offered. All except the top-line Rincon are available in anywhere from two to as many as eight separate trims, adding features such as an automatic transmission, independent suspension, and power steering. Other choices include assorted colors, accessories, and more, with varied options depending on the model. Some are available with a trailer hitch. 

The lineup includes two Sport ATV models, including a downsized model for younger riders. Sport models are short on frills, and are designed more for off-road fun. 

Honda Talon 1000R FOX Live Valve
2021 Honda Talon 1000R FOX Live Valve / American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

The variety is even broader with Honda UTVs. A total of five Rec/Utility UTV models are offered, and they are the workhorses of the lineup. These models feature four-wheel drive, automatic transmissions, and seating for two to five passengers depending on the model and trim. Safety features include three-point seatbelts and a roll cage. Available features include a plow blade, dump box, and trailer which with up to 2,000-lb towing capacity depending on model. 

In addition, three Sport UTV models are offered. Sport models are built for off-road performance, and feature full suspensions, four-wheel drive, automatic transmissions, and seating for two or four passengers. All include a roof with rollover protection and side doors. These are the models to consider purely for off-roading – and with limited storage, they aren’t designed for hauling cargo. As is the case with ATVs, most are available in multiple trims with added features. 

Honda ATV/UTV Prices

Honda ATV base prices range from $3,199 for the TRX90X for youth riders to the four-wheel drive Fourtrax Rincon at $9,499. Rec/Utility UTV models range from $9,199 for the rear-wheel-drive Pioneer 500 to $17,299 for the four-wheel-drive Pioneer 1000-5. Sport UTV base prices start at $19,999 for the Talon 1000X and go up to $23,999 for the Talon 1000X-4 Fox Live Valve. 

Honda ATV and UTV Lineup

Honda Rec/Utility ATV Lineup

Honda Fourtrax Recon: Base MSRP $4,299 – $4,549

The Fourtrax Recon is the most affordable and utilitarian of the ATVs in the Honda lineup. Powered by a 229-cc single-cylinder four stroke engine with electric start and rear-wheel drive, the Recon has a manual transmission with five forward speeds plus reverse and an automatic clutch. The front suspension is an independent double-wishbone design, while the rear suspension uses a swing arm with a single shock. Sealed drum brakes are used front and rear.

 Designed for a single rider, the Recon includes front and rear racks, and weighs 434 pounds with a full tank of fuel. The Recon ES adds an automatic transmission and starts at $4,549. 

Honda Fourtrax Rancher: Base MSRP $5,499 – $8,199

Base Fourtrax Rancher models use a 420-cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder four-stroke engine with electric start and rear-wheel drive. The manual transmission has five forward speeds plus reverse, and uses an automatic clutch. The base Fourtrax Rancher gets an independent double-wishbone front suspension and rear swing arm with a single shock absorber. Dual hydraulic disc brakes are used in front, while a sealed mechanical drum is used in the rear. 

Designed for a single rider only, the Rancher has storage racks front and rear, and weighs 580 pounds with a full tank of fuel. A total of eight separate Fourtrax Rancher trims are offered, adding additional features such as four-wheel drive, an automatic transmission, an independent rear suspension with disc brakes, and power steering. The least expensive model with four-wheel drive is the Fourtrax Rancher 4X4, which starts at $6,499. The top-trim Fourtrax Rancher 4X4 Automatic DCT IRS EPS has a base price of $8,199.

Honda Fourtrax Foreman 4X4: Base MSRP $7,399 – $8,349

The base Fourtrax Foreman is powered by a 518cc, liquid cooled and fuel injected single-cylinder four-stroke engine with electric start. The transmission is a foot-operated five-speed manual with reverse and an automatic clutch. Other standard features include selectable two or four-wheel drive, an independent front suspension and solid axle swingarm rear suspension, dual front hydraulic disc and a rear sealed drum brake, and utility racks front and rear. 

The Fourtrax weighs 636 pounds with a full tank of fuel. Stepping up to the $8,099 Fourtrax Foreman 4X4 EPS adds electric power steering. The $8,349 Fourtrax Foreman 4X4 ES EPS adds an electric shift program.

Honda Fourtrax Foreman Rubicon 4X4: Base MSRP $8,699 – $9,899

The Fourtrax Foreman Rubicon 4X4 lineup includes four trims, starting with the base Fourtrax Foreman Rubicon 4X4 Automatic DCT. This ATV is powered by a 518cc liquid-cooled and fuel-injected single-cylinder four-stroke engine with electric start, which is paired with a five-speed automatic transmission with an automatic clutch, reverse, and low range. Selectable two or four-wheel drive is standard, along with a locking front differential and an independent suspension front and rear. Brakes are dual front and single rear hydraulic discs. Other standard features include a digital instrument display and front and rear cargo racks. 

The base Rubicon’s fully fueled weight is 700 pounds, and towing capacity is 1,322 pounds. The $8,799 Fourtrax Foreman Rubicon 4X4 EPS adds power steering and a manual transmission. The $9,399 Fourtrax Foreman Rubicon 4X4 Automatic DCT EPS adds both power steering and the dual-clutch automatic. At the top of the range, the Fourtrax Foreman Rubicon 4X4 Automatic DCT EPS Deluxe adds aluminum wheels, color-matched suspension, and painted bodywork. The Deluxe starts at $9,899.

Honda Fourtrax Rincon: Base MSRP $9,499

At the top of the Honda ATV lineup, the Fourtrax Rincon features a 675-cc liquid-cooled and fuel-injected single-cylinder four-stroke engine with electric start. The transmission is an automatic with three forward gears plus reverse, and riders can switch between rear or all-wheel drive. 

The Rincon gets an independent suspension front and rear, along with dual front and single disc rear brakes. Only one trim level is available, and includes front and rear racks. The Rincon weighs in at 657 pounds. 

Honda Sport ATV Lineup

Honda TRX90X: Base MSRP $3,199

Designed to accommodate riders as young as 10 years of age, the TRX90X is an entry-level ATV with compact dimensions and user-friendly features. Powered by a 86cc single-cylinder four-stroke engine with electric start and paired with a four-speed manual transmission and automatic clutch, the TRX90X is available only with rear-wheel drive. 

The front suspension is an independent design, while the rear uses a swingarm with a single shock absorber. Two sealed drum brakes are used in front, with a single brake in the rear. The TRX90X weighs just 262 pounds. 

Honda TRX250X: Base MSRP $4,949

Larger and more powerful than the TRX90X, the TRX250X is intended for teenagers and adults. The engine is a 229cc single-cylinder four-stroke engine with electric start, matched with a five-speed manual transmission with reverse. The TRX250X uses what Honda calls a SportClutch, which is essentially a semi-automatic clutch with a handlebar-mounted lever like a conventional manual. Honda says the SportClutch combines a manual transmission with stall-prevention for riders unfamiliar with using a clutch. 

The front suspension is an independent double-wishbone design, while the rear uses a swingarm with a single shock absorber. Brakes are dual hydraulic discs in the front, and a single sealed drum in the rear. The TRX250X weighs 384 pounds when fully fueled.

Honda Rec/Utility UTV Lineup

Honda Pioneer 500: Base MSRP $9,199

A basic entry-level workhorse, the Pioneer 500 is a two-seat side-by-side design. Yet, at 50-inches wide, it will fit in the back of a pickup bed – something that can’t be said for many side-by-side designs. Power comes from a 475-cc single-cylinder fuel-injected and liquid-cooled four-stroke engine with electric start. It comes paired with an automatic transmission that can be shifted manually using paddle shifters. The Pioneer 500 can be operated in rear or four-wheel drive. Suspension is independent in the front and rear, with dual hydraulic disc brakes in front and a single hydraulic disc in back. 

Standard features include a receiver hitch and 1,000-pound towing capacity, three-point safety belts, a roll cage, and doors for the driver and passenger. Available accessories include a plow blade, winch, mirrors, roof, and more. The Pioneer 500 weighs in at 1,025 pounds.

Honda Pioneer 700: Base MSRP $10,999 – $12,499

The Pioneer 700 is a two seater that ups the ante for utility and capacity with more power, a tilting bed with 1,000-pound capacity, and other features not found in the Pioneer 500. Power comes from a 675-cc single-cylinder fuel-injected and liquid-cooled four-stroke engine with electric start, and it comes paired with an automatic transmission with three forward gears plus reverse. Drivers can choose from rear-, four-, and four-wheel drive with differential lock. Suspension is independent front and rear, with dual disc brakes in front and a single disc in the rear. 

Standard features include headlights, a receiver hitch, three-point safety belts, a roll cage, and doors for the driver and passenger. Towing capacity is 1,500 pounds, bed capacity is 1,000 pounds, and the Pioneer 700 itself weighs 1,268 pounds. Stepping up to the Pioneer 700 Deluxe adds power steering, paddle shifters, aluminum wheels, and a choice of colors. 

Honda Pioneer 700-4: Base MSRP $12,399 – $13,899

The Pioneer 700-4 gives up the tilting bed of the Pioneer 700 in favor of rear seats that increase seating capacity to four. When not needed for people, the rear seats can be folded for cargo. The 700-4 uses the same 675-cc single-cylinder fuel-injected and liquid-cooled four-stroke engine with electric start found in the Pioneer 700, and still comes paired with an automatic transmission with three forward gears plus reverse. 

Standard features include headlights, a receiver hitch, three-point safety belts, a roll cage, and doors for the driver and passengers. All other specs are the same as the Pioneer 700, including fully independent suspension and dual front/single rear disc brakes, 1,000-pound bed capacity, and 1,500-pound towing limit. The Pioneer 700-4 Deluxe adds power steering, paddle shifters, and aluminum wheels. 

Honda Pioneer 1000: Base MSRP $15,899 – $18,999

With three-across seating and a tilting cargo bed, Pioneer 1000 models are among the most powerful and capable UTVs in the Honda lineup. Power comes from a 999-cc two-cylinder liquid-cooled and fuel-injected four-stroke engine with electric start. The transmission is a dual-clutch automatic with six forward gears plus reverse and a low range. Selectable drive modes include rear or four-wheel drive, turf mode, and differential lock for added traction. Suspension is fully independent front and rear, with disc brakes for all four wheels. 

Other standard features include paddle shifters, power steering, an LCD display with speedometer, tachometer, fuel and temperature gauges, a receiver hitch, three-point safety belts, a roll cage, and doors for the driver and passengers, and more. The Pioneer 1000 weighs 1,538 pounds, towing capacity is 2,000 pounds, and the bed can handle 1,000 pounds except in California models, which can handle 600 pounds. Deluxe models add LED headlights, blacked-out aluminum wheels, and an available camo package. The Limited Edition trim gets intelligent 4WD, an upgraded suspension, skid plates, hill-start assist, brake force distribution, and more. 

Honda Pioneer 1000-5: Base MSRP $17,299 – $20,999

Pioneer 1000-5 models are mechanically similar to their Pioneer 1000 counterparts, with the addition of rear seats that can either bring seating capacity to five or be folded flat for cargo. They use the same 999-cc two-cylinder liquid-cooled and fuel-injected four-stroke engine with electric start, matched with a dual-clutch automatic transmission with six forward gears plus reverse and a low range. Suspension is independent front and rear, with disc brakes for all four wheels. 

Other standard features include power steering, an LCD display with speedometer, tachometer, fuel and temperature gauges, a receiver hitch, three-point safety belts, a roll cage, doors for the driver and passengers, and more. The Pioneer 1000-5 weighs 1,689 pounds, towing capacity is 2,000 pounds, and the bed can carry 1,000 pounds. In California, the bed capacity is limited to 600 pounds. Deluxe models add LED headlights, blacked-out aluminum wheels, and an available camo package. Limited Edition trim gets intelligent four-wheel drive, an upgraded suspension, skid plates, hill-start assist, electronic brakeforce distribution, and more. 

Honda Sport UTV Lineup

Honda Talon 1000X: Base MSRP $19,999 – $22,099

Built for off-road performance, the Honda lineup of Talon models starts with the two-seat 1000X. Powered by a 999-cc two-cylinder liquid-cooled and fuel-injected four-stroke engine with electric start, the transmission is a six-speed dual-clutch automatic that can be shifted manually using paddle shifters. Standard intelligent four-wheel drive sends power to whichever wheels need it, or can be switched off for rear-wheel-drive operation. The Talon 1000X gets an independent front and three-link rear suspension with generous travel front and rear, and disc brakes all around. 

Other standard features include power steering, a tilt steering wheel, an LCD instrument display with speedometer, tachometer, and gauges for fuel level, coolant temperature, clock, trip information, and more. All Talon 1000X trims also include rollover protection, three-point safety belts, a roof, doors, and a cargo bed. The Talon 1000X Fox Live Valve trim adds a launch mode, color-matched frame, and 2.5-inch shock absorbers for all four wheels that automatically adjust to conditions for improved ride quality and handling.

Honda Talon 1000R: Base MSRP $20,999 – $23,099

With the same basic powertrain as the Talon 1000X, the biggest upgrade with the 1000R is underneath. It offers an independent double-wishbone front and four-link rear suspension with 17.7- and 20.1-inches of travel, respectively. The engine is the same as in the Talon 1000X: a 999-cc two-cylinder liquid-cooled and fuel-injected four-stroke with electric start, matched with a six-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission with paddle shifters and low range. Intelligent four-wheel drive controls power distribution for optimum traction, or can be switched off if rear-wheel drive is preferred. 

Other standard features include four-wheel disc brakes, power steering, a tilt steering wheel, an LCD instrument display with speedometer, tachometer, and gauges for fuel level, coolant temperature, clock, trip information and more. Also included is rollover protection, three-point safety belts, a roof, doors, and a cargo bed. The Talon 1000R Fox Live Valve trim adds the same features as the 1000X Fox Live Valve mode: launch mode, color-matched frame, and 2.5-inch shock absorbers for all four wheels that can automatically adjust to terrain conditions.

Honda Talon 1000X-4: Base MSRP $21,999 – $23,999

Combining performance with added passenger capacity, the Talon 1000X-4 adds two rear stadium seats that allow an extra two people to come along for the ride. The 1000X-4 gets the same powertrain used in other Talon models: a 999-cc, two-cylinder liquid-cooled and fuel-injected four-stroke engine with electric start, paired with a six-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission with paddle shifters and low range. Intelligent four-wheel drive controls power distribution for optimum traction, or you can turn off that system and opt for rear-wheel drive. An independent double-wishbone front and three-link rear suspension provide 14.4- and 15-inches of travel, respectively, and the 1000X-4 gets disc brakes at all four corners. 

Other standard features include power steering, a tilt steering wheel, an LCD instrument display with speedometer, tachometer, and gauges for fuel level, coolant temperature, clock, trip information and more. Also included is rollover protection, three-point safety belts, a roof, and doors. Talon 1000X Fox Live Valve trim adds a launch mode, color-matched frame, and 2.5-inch shock absorbers for all four wheels that automatically adjust to conditions for improved ride quality and handling.

Honda vs. Other Brands

Honda vs. Polaris 

Two of the most dominant names in ATVs and UTVs are Honda and Polaris, and each offer a big variety of models, trims, and features. Where Honda offers a dizzying assortment of choices, the lineup from Polaris is positively mind-blowing, with dozens of models to choose from. Polaris also caters more to young riders, with some models designed for children as young as six. Honda doesn’t make models designed for riders younger than 10 years of age. Polaris covers their ATVs and UTVs with a six-month, unlimited mileage warranty. Honda provides one year of limited warranty coverage. Polaris base prices for their ATVs and UTVs range from $2,299 to $26,699. In comparison, Honda’s prices range from $3,199 to $23,999. The mainstream adult models from Honda are generally more affordable than their Polaris counterparts.

Honda vs. Yamaha

Like Honda, Yamaha offers a wide variety of ATVs and UTVs, including sport, recreational, and utility models. The Yamaha lineup also includes sport and utility ATV models for kids. Base prices range from $2,199 for the YFZ50 ATV to $25,299 for the Wolverine RMAX 1000 Limited Edition UTV. Honda ATV and UTV prices range from $3,199 to $23,999. Yamaha ATVs and UTVs come with a six-month limited warranty, and some include 10-year coverage for the drive belt. The Honda limited warranty provides one year of coverage. 

Honda vs. Can-Am

Both Honda and Can-Am cover just about every corner of the ATV and UTV market, offering recreational, performance, and utility models. The basic CanAm lineup includes six UTV models and four ATVs. However, CanAm has a broader selection of choices than Honda, with as many as 17 separate trims for some models. There’s a wide range of prices, too, starting from $2,349 for the entry-level DS ATV model for kids, and going up to more than $32,000 for the top-trim Maverick X3 performance UTV. CanAm side-by-side UTVs come with a three year limited warranty; the coverage increases to 42 months for ATVs. Honda provides one year of limited warranty coverage for both ATVs and UTVs.