$17,377 - $23,369

2017 Honda HR-V Interior Review

Note: This interior review was created when the 2017 Honda HR-V was new.

Scorecard

Interior: 7.9

The 2017 Honda HR-V has a stylish interior with an upscale layout. There are quality, soft-touch materials and a handsome design throughout the cabin. It is also very quiet, with little outside noise coming in. The center console has a logical layout and the base infotainment system is easy to use. However, the upgraded infotainment system only has touch controls, which can be difficult to master.

The HR-V's front seats are somewhat firm and taller passengers may feel cramped, but the rear seat is spacious, with enough room for tall adults and child safety seats. Especially impressive is Honda's rear Magic Seat. With four different seat configurations, the Magic Seat allows the HR-V to carry bags, bikes, and even an 8-foot kayak.

  • "No matter which trim you choose, the 2017 Honda HR-V's interior has a pleasant design with decent materials." -- Edmunds
  • "Honda's 2017 HR-V features quality materials and an upscale layout. Tan leather seating is available in top-line versions, and all models have an LCD interface in the center dash for infotainment." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "The HR-V has the best Honda cabin in a while, with soft-touch materials on the dash, armrests, and door panels; sculpted, comfortable seats; and an attractive, seamless relationship between the center stack and the center console. Overall fit and finish are superb. Every Honda should impart this sense of quality." -- Road and Track (2016)

Seating

The 2017 Honda HR-V seats five on standard cloth upholstery and comes with a tilt-and-telescopic steering wheel. Leather upholstery and heated front seats are optional. The front seats are comfortable and firm, and they're a bit narrow, which means legroom might be an issue for taller adults. However, the rear seat is spacious and has plenty of legroom, though headroom is slightly compromised by the slanted rear roofline. The rear seat also has a reclining back rest.

Honda's rear Magic Seat gives the HR-V even more space, and the front-passenger seat fully reclines to accommodate items almost 8 feet long. The smallest of passengers are easily accommodated as well, with a LATCH system for securing child seats. There are two lower anchors on the rear outboard seats and tether anchors on all rear seats. There is more than enough room for two child seats, though buckles crowd the lower anchors and can complicate installation. The upper tether anchors are easy to connect, but the middle anchor blocks visibility when in use.

  • "Getting into the front seats is effortless, but rear seat access is hindered slightly by the sloping rear roofline, the smaller door opening and raised seats. Comfort up front is somewhat compromised by the firm and narrow seats, and taller drivers will likely suffer with the lack of adjustability and legroom. Rear quarters are spacious for the class, easily accommodating average-sized adults." -- Edmunds
  • "Sitting in the backseat further reveals the HR-V's packaging prowess. While other subcompact SUVs, like the Juke and Mitsubishi Outlander Sport, have tight backseats, and the Renegade's and Trax's rear-seat comfort is merely decent, the HR-V's second row is extremely comfortable. There's generous legroom, a comfortable seating position with a reclining backrest, decent headroom and good views out the side window. It's roomy enough to rival the rear seats of some compact SUVs." -- Cars.com (2016)
  • "Where the HR-V truly excels is its packaging - perhaps its single greatest strength, according to one Honda executive. There's a ton of space for rear occupants. With 39.3 inches of rear legroom, the back seats offer more knee space than the CR-V. Plus the HR-V has the Fit's Magic Seats, which means the rear bench folds, lifts, tumbles, and splits." -- Autoblog (2016)

Interior Features

The 2017 Honda HR-V comes standard with Bluetooth, a USB port, a four-speaker sound system, a multi-angle rearview camera, and an infotainment system with a 5-inch display. Available features include push-button start, two USB ports, an upgraded infotainment system with a 7-inch touch screen, a six-speaker sound system, proximity key, satellite radio, HD Radio, navigation, and HondaLink, which integrates your smartphone with the HR-V's infotainment system.

The HR-V's standard infotainment system with an LCD screen has traditional knobs and buttons and easy-to-use audio and climate controls. The optional infotainment system may get a larger screen, but it loses the physical controls. The touch screen is fussy, making it difficult to change the radio station or adjust the volume. However, the standard steering-wheel mounted controls help reduce frustration.

See 2017 Honda HR-V specs »

  • "Base LX models have easy-to-use audio and climate systems with traditional buttons and knobs, while EX and EX-L models have touch-based systems. The latter systems look sophisticated, but their touch controls can be frustrating, especially when you have to take your eyes off the road." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "Honda has gone all-in on touch-sensitive controls on EX and EX-L trim levels. The approach gives the dashboard a clean, uncluttered appearance, but also sacrifices some usability. EX and EX-L trims get a 7-inch touch-screen multimedia system, and the EX-L adds navigation. I like how the screen recognizes smartphone-style pinch and stretch gestures for map zooming, but the touch-sensitive volume control isn't ideal. It's just not as easy to use as a traditional knob. The standard steering wheel audio controls, however, are intuitive." -- Cars.com (2016)
  • "Honda has been moving toward an all-virtual interface for audio and climate controls (no physical buttons or knobs), and that has been almost completely realized in the HR-V; only audio on/off, CD eject, and day/night screen functions still make use of tiny, traditional buttons. While it gives a modern, uncluttered, 'cell-phone' look to the dash, it doesn't do anything for functionality. Volume is adjusted with a virtual slide bar that lags behind finger movement (and is tough to adjust on a rough road), infotainment sources and selections take multiple screens to choose, and all climate functions (temperature, mode, and fan speed) are adjusted through virtual, repetitive-step 'buttons.' (Note that the base model—which we didn't test—comes with a manual climate system that may differ in its controls.) As a result, some might not like the arrangement at first, but some functions can be adjusted through steering-wheel controls, and it all may become less tedious with continued use." -- Consumer Guide (2016)

Cargo

The HR-V offers great cargo-carrying flexibility with Honda's rear Magic Seat, which can be folded into four different configurations, giving this subcompact SUV the adaptability to carry cargo of various shapes and sizes. Fold the rear seat up and you can carry tall items, or fold the rear and front-passenger seats down and you can carry long items. There is 24.3 cubic feet of cargo space behind the rear seat and 58.8 with it folded, which is more space than almost all of the HR-V's rivals.

  • "As part of the burgeoning subcompact SUV class, the HR-V slots in under Honda's CR-V and larger Pilot. It also utilizes one of the company's clever innovations, the so-called Magic Seat from the related Fit hatchback, which features a flip-up rear seat cushion to accommodate tall and narrow cargo like a bicycle or a flat-screen TV." -- Edmunds
  • "Like the Fit, the HR-V compensates for its small exterior size with an impressive amount of very versatile cargo space. Aside from the usual split-folding rear seat backs (which can be folded without having to remove the headrests, as they overlap the seat back when lowered), the HR-V's rear-seat cushion can be flipped up to provide a tall load space, while the front-passenger seat back can be folded back to create a long channel, though it's not level with the cargo floor. The cargo area is wide at the rear and includes a good amount of underfloor storage." -- Consumer Guide (2016)
  • "The HR-V follows the Fit's lead in cleverly placing the fuel tank under the front seats, which allows the rear seat cushion to flip up, creating a practical space for ferrying taller objects. Alternately, the split rear seatbacks can flop forward, as can the front passenger seatback. Even when it's not showing off its gymnastic flexibility, the HR-V boasts the largest cargo hold among its peers, whether that's behind the rear seats or with that row folded. And the extremely low cargo floor facilitates easy loading, a boon for those who frequently haul heavy items." -- Car and Driver (2016)

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