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Complete Guide to Car Loans & Leasing

Use our car financing tools to apply for a new or used car loan, or to refinance your current vehicle. Our calculators can help you estimate monthly car payments and find out which cars you can afford. We also have tips on how to finance a car and whether you should buy or lease.

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Apply for financing today, and get up to four offers. Compare your options before visiting the dealership to make sure you get the best rate for you. It's free, quick, and easy.

Car Loans and Leases

Getting a car loan or leasing a car isn't something most people do often. Not only is the process something that you may not have a lot of practice with, but car loans and leases have their own vocabulary, steps, and pitfalls. We've put together this guide to help you finance or lease your next car with confidence, and we'll show you how to avoid paying thousands more than you should.

At U.S. News Best Cars, we’ve been helping people find the right car and navigate the car loan and leasing process since 2007. The writers of this guide are experts when it comes to car financing and leasing, with decades of experience helping consumers. We’ve also interviewed experts from automotive lenders and credit bureaus to give you an inside look at how financing and leasing works. If you invest some time reading this guide, you’ll be able to lease or finance your next car while avoiding mistakes that can cost you money.

Car Calculators

While your dream car may seem affordable, if you can't fit the payment into your monthly budget, you won't be able to get that car in your driveway and keep it there. Our car loan calculator will translate the sticker price of the car you want into monthly payments so you can make sure it fits your budget.

What if you know how much you can afford for a monthly car payment, but don't know how much car that monthly car payment will buy you? If you can swing $200 a month, can you get a $25,000 car? Our car affordability calculator will help you figure it out.

You can check out both of those calculators below:

Calculate Your Monthly Car Payment

Start with your expected vehicle price

Look up vehicle price

How Much Car Can You Afford?

Start with how much you can spend per month

Here’s what we'll cover in this guide:

Car Financing and Car Loans

Financing a car simply means getting a car loan. Rather than pay cash up front, car financing requires that you take out a car loan and pay it back over time, usually with interest. This is the path that most car buyers take when purchasing a car. However, the process of taking out an auto loan can be complicated, and making mistakes can have long-term financial consequences.

How to Finance a Car and Get a Car Loan

The first step to saving money on a car loan is to shop around for a loan just like you’d shop around for a car. Although a car dealership can handle financing for you, they’ll be looking to make a profit, and their profit comes from your pocket. Contact banks, credit unions, and other lenders to get an idea of the type of loan you qualify for, which will help you secure the best deal on your new car loan.

The interest rate and the loan term are two major factors in determining if a car loan is a good deal or not. The interest rate on a car loan is the amount the lender charges you to borrow their money. It’s a percentage of the loan amount, and it accumulates over the length of the loan, also called the loan term. While taking a long time to pay your auto loan back can lead to lower monthly payments, it gives more time for interest to accrue, costing you more money in the long run.

Because the interest rate you pay on your car loan is the biggest driver of the overall cost of the loan, you’ll want to make sure you get the best rate you can. People with excellent credit get the lowest rates because they’re at a lower risk for defaulting on the loan and not paying it off. People with poor credit ratings will pay higher rates because there’s a higher chance they won’t repay the loan in full. If your credit isn’t in the best shape, consider spending a few months rehabbing it. Paying bills on time and lowering your debt-to-income ratio can help you save thousands in interest on your car loan.

Beyond the interest rate, the down payment you make has a huge impact on your car loan. A down payment is a cash payment that offsets the amount of money you need to borrow to pay for a car. Your down payment can come from money you have on hand, equity you have in your trade-in, or from a cash back deal offered by the automaker. A hefty down payment not only lowers your car financing costs, but it also decreases the risk that you’ll owe more on your car loan than what the car is worth.

Read more about How to Finance a Car and Get a Car Loan.

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How to Finance a Used Car

Financing a used car has a few key differences from new-car financing. While a lot of the loan terms are the same, you need to make sure you’re getting the right loan for your purchase.

Used-car loans tend to have higher interest rates than new-car loans because lenders see them as a higher risk. Used cars are often out of their manufacturer’s warranty, which means that they could have expensive repairs, making it tougher for you to keep the car running and make your car payments.

Even though you likely won’t get as low of an interest rate on a used car loan as you would on a new-car loan, you should still shop around for the best rate you can get and show up at the dealership with financing. That way, you can focus your negotiations on the price of the car, not your loan terms.

With a used-car loan, you’ll want to pay particular attention to the loan term. While stretching out a used-car loan over six or seven years will give you low monthly payments, you’ll want to make sure the car will still be running for that long. After all, you don’t want to be making payments on something that’s broken down in your driveway. Our used car rankings can help you find a dependable used car, but keep the life of your used car in mind when getting used-car financing.

Read more about How to Finance a Used Car and How to Get the Best Used Car Loan Rate.

Car Loan Companies

The company you choose when getting your car loan can have a tremendous effect on the amount of money you save and the customer service you get. That’s why U.S. News & World Report has begun reviewing auto loan providers. To get you started on your search, we’ve focused on four of the top banks. You can read our reviews of them below.

Average New Car Loan Rates

With the average new car costing more than $36,000, most people need to take out a loan when purchasing a new ride. Choosing your car loan is an important part of the car buying process. Make the right pick, and you could save thousands. Make the wrong pick, and the opposite could be true.

To get current average auto loan rates, we looked at data from our partner myAutoloan. You can see the results below, organized by credit score. Click here to learn more about the average auto loan rates right now.

Auto Loan Rates

Credit Score

New Car Loan

750+3.09
700 - 7493.27
650 - 6997.15
450 - 64912.07
449 or less14.74

You can also compare the average auto loan rates from top banks by using our chart here.

myAutoloan

APR Range: 1.99% - 27%

Loan Term: 24 - 84 months

Loan Range: $8,000 - $100,000

Applicant Requirements:

At least 18 years old, resident of the U.S. (except Alaska and Hawaii), with min. income of $1,800/month and min. credit score of 500

Vehicle Requirements:

Max mileage of 125,000 miles, 10 years old or newer

myAutoloan presents up to four offers from a variety of participating lenders based on your specific loan requirements, offering a wide variety of choice and selections.

LightStream

APR Range: 3.34% - 17.49% (AutoPay Discount of 0.50% also included)

Loan Term: 24 - 144 months

Loan Range: $5,000 - $100,000

Applicant Requirements:

Must have good to excellent credit*

Vehicle Requirements:

No restrictions

LightStream caters heavily to applicants with very strong credit scores, offering a streamlined application process and a Rate Beat program that guarantees they'll beat any other qualifying offers an applicant receives.

Capital One

APR Range: 3.99% - 10.08%

Loan Term: 36 - 72 months

Loan Range: $4,000+

Applicant Requirements:

$1,800/month minimum income requirements, resident of the U.S. (except Alaska or Hawaii)

Vehicle Requirements:

Limited to vehicles available through the Capital One network of dealers

Capital One offers a pre-qualification, which allows you to take your offer to any participating dealer within 30 days.

Chase

APR Range: 4.29% - 24.99%

Loan Term: 48 - 72 months

Loan Range: $4,000+

Applicant Requirements:

At least 18 years old

Vehicle Requirements:

Limited to vehicles available through the Chase network of dealers, no older than 2008

After your application is approved, Chase will send the information to the dealer you choose. The offer is good for 30 days.

Bank of America

APR Range: 3.49+%

Loan Term: 12 - 75 months

Loan Range: $7,500 - $100,000

Applicant Requirements:

At least 18 years old (19 in Alabama or Nebraska) U.S. resident

Vehicle Requirements:

Max mileage of 125,000 miles, 10 years old or newer, valued at $6,000+, plus additional restrictions

Bank of America Preferred Rewards clients can receive an interest rate discount of 0.25-0.50% depending on their tier at the time of applying for an auto loan.

Company

Details

Requirements

Descriptions

myAutoloan

APR Range: 1.99% - 27%

Loan Term: 24 - 84 months

Loan Range: $8,000 - $100,000

Applicant Requirements:

At least 18 years old, resident of the U.S. (except Alaska and Hawaii), with min. income of $1,800/month and min. credit score of 500

Vehicle Requirements:

Max mileage of 125,000 miles, 10 years old or newer

myAutoloan presents up to four offers from a variety of participating lenders based on your specific loan requirements, offering a wide variety of choice and selections.

LightStream

APR Range: 3.34% - 17.49% (AutoPay Discount of 0.50% also included)

Loan Term: 24 - 144 months

Loan Range: $5,000 - $100,000

Applicant Requirements:

Must have good to excellent credit*

Vehicle Requirements:

No restrictions

LightStream caters heavily to applicants with very strong credit scores, offering a streamlined application process and a Rate Beat program that guarantees they'll beat any other qualifying offers an applicant receives.

Capital One

APR Range: 3.99% - 10.08%

Loan Term: 36 - 72 months

Loan Range: $4,000+

Applicant Requirements:

$1,800/month minimum income requirements, resident of the U.S. (except Alaska or Hawaii)

Vehicle Requirements:

Limited to vehicles available through the Capital One network of dealers

Capital One offers a pre-qualification, which allows you to take your offer to any participating dealer within 30 days.

Chase

APR Range: 4.29% - 24.99%

Loan Term: 48 - 72 months

Loan Range: $4,000+

Applicant Requirements:

At least 18 years old

Vehicle Requirements:

Limited to vehicles available through the Chase network of dealers, no older than 2008

After your application is approved, Chase will send the information to the dealer you choose. The offer is good for 30 days.

Bank of America

APR Range: 3.49+%

Loan Term: 12 - 75 months

Loan Range: $7,500 - $100,000

Applicant Requirements:

At least 18 years old (19 in Alabama or Nebraska) U.S. resident

Vehicle Requirements:

Max mileage of 125,000 miles, 10 years old or newer, valued at $6,000+, plus additional restrictions

Bank of America Preferred Rewards clients can receive an interest rate discount of 0.25-0.50% depending on their tier at the time of applying for an auto loan.

Disclaimer: All information provided here is based on Annual Percentage Rate estimates from the websites of the individual lenders on 12/18/2018. It is not a binding or guaranteed loan offer. Individual auto loan rates will vary.

Notes: In compiling this data, we used new-car purchase rates for Virginia.

*To meet LightStream's standard for good credit, you must have several years of credit history with a variety of account types, including credit cards, installment debt (vehicle loans), and mortgages. LightStream also prefers to see few, if any, delinquencies and a history of savings, evidenced by things like deposit accounts and manageable revolving credit card debt. You'll also want to provide proof of stable and sufficient income to repay current debt obligations as well as any new loan with LightStream.

Average Used Car Loan Rates

The average used car now costs over $20,000. While that’s less than the $36,000 an average new car will cost you, it’s still too expensive for most people to afford without a loan.

That’s why U.S. News has turned to our partner myAutoloan to get the average used car loan rate for various credit scores. You can see the results on the chart below. Click here if you’d like to learn more about the average used car loan rates right now.

Averge Used Auto Loan Rates

Credit Score

Interest Rate

750+3.56%
700 - 7493.56%
650 - 6998.02%
450 - 64910.88%
449 or less18.36%

How to Buy a Car with Bad Credit

You might have a few dings on your credit report, but you still need a car. Having bad credit puts some significant hurdles between you and getting a car loan, but you can overcome each of them.

If you can hold off on buying a car, take some time to improve your credit. Lower your debt-to-income ratio and pay your bills on time for a few months. Those steps can boost your credit score and net you a lower car-loan interest rate.

If you can’t wait for a new car, you’ll likely end up paying more for a car loan if you have bad credit. That said, you should still shop around and get competing quotes from lenders to make sure you don’t pay too much for your loan. After you get a car loan, there are other steps you can take to continue to rehab your credit and even lower your car-loan costs.

Read more about How to Buy a Car With Bad Credit.

How to Get Out of an Upside-Down Car Loan

Owing more money on your car than it is worth can be a tremendous problem if something significant happens to your car – say it is stolen or totalled in a wreck. When the insurance pays out, they’ll only cover the value of the car. If you owe more on it than it is worth, you could end up owing your lender more money than you’re able to pay. It can happen to you even if you’ve paid all of your payments on time. Buying a vehicle that depreciates quickly and taking out a loan with a long repayment term can increase your risk of being underwater.

If you do find yourself underwater on a car loan, or you’d like to learn more about avoiding upside-down car loans, read our article about How to Get Out of an Upside-Down Car Loan.

How to Refinance a Car Loan

Maybe you didn’t get the best deal on financing when you bought your car, or maybe your credit score has improved since you bought it. Refinancing your car loan can get you a lower rate, more affordable payments, and save you thousands.

However, refinancing a car loan isn’t always easy. While you might get mailers or ads from lenders asking you to refinance your car loan with them, you still need to do your research. Refinancing a car loan means comparing offers from lenders and running the numbers to make sure that you don’t end up losing money on the deal.

In order to refinance a car loan, you’ll need to apply to lenders for a new car loan. They’ll pull your credit score, so make sure you’ve checked your credit report recently. You’ll want to dispute any errors on your report before applying. Once you have offer from lenders, you’ll need to compare what they’re offering, looking at the overall cost of the new loan, including any fees, and not just a monthly payment.

There are also a few situations where you should not refinance your car loan, like if your credit score is worse than when you took out your loan, or you owe more than your car is worth. If your current interest rate is very low, a new loan likely won’t match or beat it.

Read more about How to Refinance a Car Loan.

Should You Use In-House Financing From Car Dealers?

Here’s one question we get a lot: Should you use the in-house financing from car dealers? As ever, the short answer is – it depends.

The pros of in-house financing at a dealer include speed, convenience, and access to manufacturer-sponsored car deals. However, dealers usually need to add a markup to make it worth their while, and that can mean higher interest rates. You’ll want to shop around to make sure you’re getting the best deal.

Read more about the Pros and Cons of In-House Financing From Car Dealers.

Car Leasing

Though leasing has grown in popularity in the past few years, it’s still a foreign concept for many car shoppers. Making a car-leasing mistake can cost you thousands over the life of your lease, and you can run up expensive penalties and fees when your lease ends.

In the following sections, we’ll go over the differences between buying and leasing, how to lease a car, and how to get out of a car lease you don’t want anymore.

Buying vs. Leasing

Buying isn't right for everyone, and leasing a car isn't right for everyone. We'll help you decide which option makes the most sense for you.

When you buy a car, you pay – either in cash or with a car loan – for the full price of the car. When you lease a car, you only pay for its depreciation over a set period of time. For example, if you’re buying a $40,000 car, you pay the full $40,000. If you lease that car for three years, and it’s expected to be worth $28,000 at the end of the lease, you only pay the difference between the price and residual value – in this case, $12,000.

What you pay for the lease is broken into monthly payments. In most cases, you’ll be expected to pay some money up front, and you will need to pay interest on the lease, which in leasing is referred to as the money factor.

Not everyone will qualify to lease a car. Most leases, especially ones that are incentives offered by the manufacturer, require very good credit to qualify.

Also, not everyone should lease a car. Car leases have mileage limitations, and you can face steep penalties if you exceed those limits or put too much wear and tear on the car. However, leasing does tend to give you a lower monthly payment, and you get a new car every few years.

Read more about Buying vs Leasing a Car.

How to Lease a Car

Shopping for the best lease deal is a crucial step in saving money when leasing a car, but many consumers don’t know how to compare lease deals. The fact that leasing uses different vocabulary than car loans can make it difficult for you to compare deals and figure out how much you’ll actually end up paying for your new car lease. Before leasing a car, you’ll need to understand the meaning of different lease terms, know what parts of a lease are negotiable, and be able to compare lease deals. It’s also important to know the impact of your credit on your ability to lease, and the limits on most car leases. You’ll also have to know what to do when your lease ends.

Before leasing a car, you’ll need to understand the meaning of different lease terms, know what parts of a lease are negotiable, and be able to compare lease deals. It’s also important to know the impact of your credit on your ability to lease, and the limits on most car leases. You’ll also have to know what to do when your lease ends.

Read more about How to Lease a Car.

How to Get out of a Car Lease

Sometimes, circumstances change and that lease you signed just isn’t working out. Getting out of the lease the right way can save your credit rating and sanity. Getting out of a lease the wrong way can end up costing you thousands in fees.

Getting out of a car lease is difficult because you don’t actually own a leased car. Instead, you’ve signed a contract agreeing to essentially a long-term rental, where you pay for the depreciation of the car that results from your use. If you try to terminate that agreement early, the leasing company will lose money. That’s why lease contracts are difficult to break; leasing companies protect themselves from loss.

You can get out of a car lease by defaulting on it, but that should be your last resort. Defaulting on your lease by not making payments will ruin your credit. Working with your leasing company to go through early termination of a car lease isn’t ideal, since you’ll still likely pay thousands in fees and penalties, but you’ll escape with your credit intact.

If the car you’re leasing is worth more than what you owe on your lease, you may be able to take it to a dealer and sell it. However, you’ll want to make sure you’ll get enough from the sale of the car to pay off your lease, and that your lease allows for this option. You may also be able to take your car back to the dealer and have them help you get out of your lease, provided you lease another car from them. This is a good option if you’re not looking to get out of your lease for financial reasons, but because your circumstances have changed -- maybe you drive a two-seat sports car but have a baby on the way.

There are services that allow others to assume your lease for you, but this tactic comes with its own pitfalls, including fees and risks to your credit if the person who assumes your lease defaults on it.

Read more about How to Get Out of a Car Lease.

How to Negotiate the Best Price on a Car

A car’s price isn’t set in stone, and negotiating it is a key part of getting a good deal and not overpaying. However, negotiating a car price isn’t something that most people look forward to, and it’s easy to feel like you’re at a disadvantage. After all, your car dealer negotiates deals every day, and you likely only buy a car every few years.

There are steps you can take to negotiate the best price on a new car. Knowing what price you should shoot for, and the available deals and incentives on the car you want are good first steps. It helps to treat the process as a business transaction instead of an emotional one, as does knowing how to make dealers compete for your business. The most important skill in getting the best price on a new car is knowing when to walk away from a bad deal.

If you don’t like to negotiate, you can use the U.S. News Best Price Program to get upfront pricing from a certified dealer on your new car. People who use the Best Price Program typically save thousands off their vehicle’s MSRP.

Read more about How to Negotiate the Best Car Price.