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Only one state in the country – Wyoming – has a smaller population than Vermont. However, the folks who do live in Vermont seem to love driving there. Consider recent data: Close to 557,000 people are licensed to hit the road in the state, and that’s out of a total population of about 626,000. So, Vermont has a per-capita licensure rate of .89 – above both the national average and the average of key similar states. Vermont’s registration figures tell a similar tale. With 621,000 registered vehicles, the per-capita rate tops .99. Finally, the same report indicated that Vermonters drive 20% further each year on a per-capita basis than the national average.

The good news for insurance costs is that they’re usually not based on per-capita figures. As an example, despite making the most of their driving opportunities, people in Vermont still end up travelling fewer overall miles than residents of nearly any other state in the union. That’s important because how far you drive has a definite influence on how much you pay for auto coverage.

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Events that lead to more claims, like crashes and auto thefts, can boost costs as well. For Vermont, this means dealing with roughly 12,600 motor-vehicle accidents per year, including 65 that involve a fatality. The state additionally sees some 195 stolen vehicles annually, which works out to approximately 30 thefts per 100,000 people. More than 2,450 people are also arrested each year in the state for driving under the influence (DUI). Serious violations like that can lead to a significant increase in policy prices. But again, those numbers aren’t very big in the grand scheme of things. Maine – with similar demographics to Vermont – reports close to 790 auto thefts and 5,835 DUI arrests annually. In other words, Maine has 140% more stolen vehicles and over 300% more arrests for driving under the influence. 

Aging, too, affects insurance premiums. The impact is especially heavy for younger male drivers, who often face the very highest rates. This is reflected in our own study, which is detailed below. The short story here is that when we created sample profiles at three different age levels, the most expensive projected quotes went to the youngest drivers. 

In the real world, young drivers make up a very small percentage of Vermont motorists. Less than 2% of the licensed drivers in the state are men aged 19 and under. Tallying up all drivers in that age bracket still only adds up to about 3.3% of Vermont’s total driving population. Turning to older drivers, insurance expenses generally start rising again when you pass the age of 65 – just not to the same point as for younger motorists. It’s partly explained by the fact that older drivers get into far fewer accidents. In Vermont, a recent study found a rolling five-year average of 60 major crashes per year for drivers 65 and over in the state. Drivers under 25 were involved in 85 major crashes annually using the same measurement. 

The result is that you can end up with fairly inexpensive auto insurance premiums in Vermont. Our data shows the average national representative cost for a one-year sample policy is about $272 higher than Vermont's average rate in our study. 

Cheapest Car Insurance Companies in Vermont

The rates shown here are based on a study performed by Quadrant Information Services on behalf of U.S. News. The study examined rates from the nine largest car insurance companies in the United States, using certain driver profiles. Your rates will differ.

How We Found the Cheapest Car Insurance Companies

At U.S. News, we’re all about helping people make life’s important decisions. Our college rankings, launched in 1983, set the standard in educational rankings. Our rankings in other fields, like healthcare, government, and the automotive sphere, help people and thought leaders make choices that make lives better. Now we’re continuing to empower you with the information you need to make the right choices for your life with our Cheapest Car Insurance Rankings. 

Our Study Rates

For this study, U.S. News worked with Quadrant Information Services to analyze a report of insurance rates in all 50 states from the nine largest national car insurance companies, though not every company operates in every state. Quadrant obtained publicly available rate data that car insurers file with state regulators. Our study rates are based on profiles for both male and female drivers aged 25, 35, and 60. Vehicles used include the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150, with annual mileage ranging from 6,000 and 12,000. Three car insurance coverage levels were used, as were credit tiers of good, fair, and poor. Clean driving records and records with one accident, one speeding violation, and one DUI were also used in the calculations of certain driver archetypes. 

To get the study rates shown here, we computed the mean rate for male and female drivers aged 25, 35, and 60 who drive 15,000 miles per year and have medium coverage, good credit, and a clean driving record. The rates shown here are for comparative purposes only and should not be considered “average” rates available by individual insurers. Because car insurance rates are based on individual factors, your car insurance rates will differ from the rates shown here. 

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How Much Does Car Insurance Cost in Vermont?

See the Cheapest Car Insurance Companies

The sample rates for our hypothetical Vermont drivers are on the low side overall. According to our analysis, the average representative rate is $1,144 per year in the state, which is lower than the national average. On the other hand, near neighbors Maine and New Hampshire offer cheaper representative rates. Annual representative policies are $876 in Maine and $887 in New Hampshire.

The data for Vermont also stands out for its wide range of price points. Among Vermont’s average representative rates, the most expensive coverage (Progressive) is more than three times costlier than the most inexpensive (USAA).

Vermont Car Insurance Rates by Age

Company

25-year-old female

25-year-old male

35-year-old female

35-year-old male

60-year-old female

60-year-old male

Allstate

$1,572

$1,725

$1,386

$1,386

$1,325

$1,325

Geico

$846

$993

$736

$779

$676

$676

Nationwide

$1,114

$1,221

$903

$921

$785

$845

Progressive

$2,022

$2,157

$1,968

$1,949

$1,729

$1,739

State Farm

$1,202

$1,328

$1,089

$1,089

$985

$985

USAA

$748

$779

$570

$572

$524

$522

Among the most influential factors on insurance coverage come from your personal demographics. Age and gender are particularly important, and they work together to affect how much you pay for auto insurance everywhere. 

The lowest representative rates in Vermont go to female driver profiles aged 60 years old. Profiles that fit this demographic enjoy representative rates of just $1,004 per year. The average representative rate rises by $112 for male driver profiles of the same age. 25-year-old female and male driver profiles pay the highest representative rates in Vermont: $1,251 and $1,367, respectively. For 35-year-old driver profiles, females pay an average representative rate of $1,109. For males in the same age group, the rate climbs to $1,116.

To determine the average rates based on gender and age, we created driver profiles for males and females in each of the following ages: 25 years, 35 years, and 60 years. The profiles also have a clean driving record, insurance coverage for 12,000 miles per year, a medium level of insurance coverage, and a good credit score. We used three vehicles for our driver profiles: the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

Vermont Car Insurance Rates by Mileage

Company

6,000 miles annually

12,000 miles annually

Allstate

$1,351

$1,453

Geico

$731

$784

Nationwide

$965

$965

Progressive

$1,927

$1,927

State Farm

$976

$1,113

USAA

$593

$619

Annual mileage doesn’t have a significant effect on representative rates in Vermont. In our analysis, the representative rate for driver profiles covering 12,000 miles annually is $1,144. Cutting the distance in half, down to 6,000 miles of annual travel, brings the average representative rate down to $1,090 – a difference of just $54.

We created two driver profiles to compare how annual mileage can change car insurance rates: one with low mileage (6,000 miles per year) and one with high mileage (12,000 miles per year). The profiles covered males and females in the 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old age groups with a medium level of insurance coverage, a good credit score, and a clean driving record. The vehicles used in our study were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

Vermont Car Insurance Rates by Coverage Type

Company

Low

Medium

High

Allstate

$1,418

$1,453

$1,502

Geico

$759

$784

$813

Nationwide

$989

$965

$953

Progressive

$1,858

$1,927

$2,073

State Farm

$1,048

$1,113

$1,187

USAA

$601

$619

$643

The results were right in line with our expectations: We expected insurers would charge extra money for more coverage, and they did. The surprise was that the price adjustments were relatively moderate. For our driver profiles with the legal minimum amount of insurance, the average study rate is $1,112 a year. An additional $32 annually – $1,144 in total – enough to expand protection to a medium level. The representative rate for high car insurance coverage is just $51 higher than the rate for medium protection. 

We created identical profiles in our study to represent drivers, then found out how rates changed with the three levels of coverage. The profiles were assigned a clean driving record, a good credit score, and 12,000 miles of annual driving. We used both males and females aged 25, 35, and 60. The 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150 were the vehicles used in our analysis. 

Vermont Car Insurance Rates by Credit Score

Company

Good

Fair

Poor

Allstate

$1,453

$1,685

$2,021

Geico

$784

$826

$1,013

Nationwide

$965

$1,143

$1,329

Progressive

$1,927

$2,394

$3,221

State Farm

$1,113

$1,508

$2,763

USAA

$619

$758

$1,317

The average representative premium for someone in Vermont with good credit is $1,144. For those with fair credit, the average representative rate is $1,385. According to our study, a Vermont driver profile with poor credit pays representative rates that are $800 higher than a profile with good credit. 

Based on profiles of male and female drivers aged 25, 35, and 60, our study verified that credit scores affect car insurance rates. We created a profile for each level of credit score (good, fair, and poor) and assigned the profiles a clean driving record, a good credit score, a medium level of insurance coverage, and 12,000 miles of annual driving. The 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150 were the vehicles used in our analysis. 

Vermont Car Insurance Rates by Driving Record

Company

Clean record

With 1 speeding violation

With 1 accident

With 1 DUI

Allstate

$1,453

$1,662

$1,918

$1,979

Geico

$784

$886

$1,315

$2,189

Nationwide

$965

$1,151

$1,397

$1,712

Progressive

$1,927

$2,310

$3,030

$2,101

State Farm

$1,113

$1,218

$1,322

$1,218

USAA

$619

$709

$858

$1,262

The lowest representative premiums in our study – $1,144 annually – are associated with profiles that have clean, ticket-free driving histories. One speeding ticket increases this average representative rate by $179. With one accident, the average representative rate comes in at $1,640, and it rises to $1,743 with one DUI. 

To find out just how much of an effect a person's driving record has on insurance rates, we made driving profiles with a clean record, with one speeding violation, with one accident, and with one instance of driving under the influence (DUI). These driving record representative profiles were based on 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old males and females who drove 12,000 miles per year and had a medium level of insurance coverage and a good credit score. Vehicles used in the analysis were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

Vermont Car Insurance Rates by City

In our study, Winooski enjoys the lowest representative car insurance rate in Vermont: $1,091. Next up are South Burlington and Burlington, with rates of $1,095 and $1,105, respectively. Insurance costs are steepest in Newport. That city’s average representative rate comes in at $1,160. 

Within each state, insurance rates can vary dramatically from city to city. To get a sense of how these differences affect car insurance premiums, we looked at average representative rates across 10 of Iowa’s top cities. In our study, we used male and female driver profiles aged 25, 35, and 60 who put 12,000 miles on the odometer each year. Our profiles have medium insurance coverage, a clean driving record, and good credit. We included three vehicles in our study: the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

City

Average Rate

Burlington

$1,105

South Burlington

$1,095

Rutland

$1,120

Essex Junction

$1,119

Barre

$1,137

Montpelier

$1,139

Winooski

$1,091

St. Albans

$1,126

Newport

$1,160

Bellows Falls

$1,149

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Vermont Auto Insurance Minimum Coverage Requirements

Vermont mandates that all drivers carry both liability insurance and uninsured motorist coverage in the following amounts:

  • Bodily injury liability coverage of $25,000 for one person killed or hurt and $50,000 for two or more people in a single accident.
  • Property damage coverage of $10,000 for a single accident.
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury liability coverage of $50,000 for one person killed or hurt and $100,000 for two or more people in a single accident.
  • Uninsured motorist property damage coverage of $10,000 for a single accident.

Of course, drivers can (and many should) choose to carry coverage in amounts higher than the minimums. Vermont does not require drivers to carry collision coverage or comprehensive coverage.

For drivers with the financial means to do so, it is possible to post a bond or self-insure in Vermont rather than be insured by a company.

Cheapest Car Insurance in Vermont

Category

Cheapest Company

Drivers with a Military Affiliation

USAA

Young Adult Drivers

GEICO

Married Adult Drivers

GEICO

Senior Drivers

GEICO

Drivers with Good Credit

GEICO

Drivers with Poor Credit

GEICO

Drivers with a Clean Record

GEICO

Drivers with One Speeding Violation

GEICO

Drivers with One Accident

GEICO

Drivers with One DUI

State Farm

Low-mileage Drivers

GEICO

High-mileage Drivers

GEICO

Drivers with Low Coverage

GEICO

Drivers with High Coverage

GEICO

Drivers with Used Cars

GEICO

Drivers with New Cars

GEICO

The most affordable representative rates in our study go to those who choose low coverage. Within those segments, USAA offers the lowest average representative rate: $601 per year. Geico is right behind, at $759 per year.

The companies with the two most expensive average representative rates in the low-coverage segment are Progressive and Allstate. According to our study, rates charged by those carriers come in at $1,858 and $1,418, respectively. 

Within each state, insurance rates can vary dramatically from city to city. To get a sense of how these differences affect car insurance premiums, we looked at average representative rates across 10 of Iowa’s top cities. In our study, we used male and female driver profiles aged 25, 35, and 60 who put 12,000 miles on the odometer each year. Our profiles have medium insurance coverage, a clean driving record, and good credit. We included three vehicles in our study: the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

Why Car Insurance Rates Vary in Vermont

The findings from our study provide a good indication of what causes car insurance rates to go up in Vermont and what causes them to go down. For instance, driver profiles with good credit and a history of safe motoring will tend to pay less for the same policy than folks with blemishes on their records. And 60-year old driver profiles save money compared to younger ones. Your gender, how far you drive, and how much coverage you want will all make a small but noticeable impact on premiums in Vermont as well. 

Naphat Photography / Getty Images

If it doesn’t always seem logical, remember that insurers peg their rates to the likelihood that a given driver will make a claim. Here’s an example: Even though you wouldn’t think getting married makes you a better driver, the raw numbers indicate that single people file more claims – so all else being equal, single drivers have higher premiums. 

How to Get the Cheapest Car Insurance in Vermont

Our research can point the way to insurance savings for many people in Vermont. As you may have noticed, there are wide differences in the representative rates charged by some of the insurance carriers in our study. Although these figures are only meant as examples, they are good evidence for shopping around in the real world before you put your money out. 

By taking advantage of discounts, you can accrue further savings. For example, carriers may lower your rate if you agree to online billing or if you pass an advanced driving-skills class. If you go that last route, just ensure that any drop in your premium outweighs what you pay for the class – otherwise there won’t be a net savings to your budget. 

You can also ask any affinity groups you belong to, such as alumni or veterans organizations, if they have money-saving partnerships with insurance companies. Your own employer or credit union may have teamed up with an insurer in the same way. This essentially gives you a group discount for your individual insurance needs. 

You may also choose to have your premiums specifically tailored to your individual driving habits. The better those habits, the less you pay. You will have to plug a high-tech tracking device into your car, however. That’s how insurers gather data about how you drive. 

Important Laws Around Auto Insurance in Vermont

Like most states, Vermont follows “at-fault” principles when it comes to damages in an auto accident. These guidelines require that the person who is responsible for causing the damages is responsible for paying them. In “no-fault” states – at least in certain circumstances – each person’s own insurance pays damages regardless of who caused the accident. 

Vermont then determines the specific dollar amount of the damages using the doctrine of comparative negligence: You can still recover damages if you were partially at fault in the accident, but the amount is decreased by the extent to which you were responsible. In other words, if the Vermont court rules that you were 25% responsible for a crash, the amount you can recover is cut by the same percentage. 

A physical insurance card is no longer necessary in Vermont. Proof of financial responsibility can be shown “using a portable electronic device.” 

Along with other penalties, driving without insurance in Vermont may require that you take out separate financial responsibility coverage. This type of policy attaches to you as a person, not to a specific car, and is designed for any time you drive any vehicle. 

Vermont Driving Laws and Punishments

Auto insurance is mandatory in Vermont, and the penalty for driving without it can include a civil penalty of up to $500, accrual of points on your driving record, and/or the need for financial responsibility insurance.

Using handheld electronic devices while driving is illegal in the state. Vermont law goes on to clarify that it’s okay to use a smartphone or similar device to communicate with first responders in an emergency or if you’ve pulled off the road and are safely and legally stopped. Relying on a hands-free mode for your phone is also legal. The penalty for a first violation is a fine of between $100 and $200, plus two points on your record. Second and subsequent violations – within a two-year period – can double those amounts. You get more points on your record for violations in school and work zones, too. 

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Vermont prohibits driving under the influence of alcohol or any other drug. For the former, a person with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level of 0.08% is assumed to be under the influence. “Other drugs” include marijuana, which is legal in Vermont. You are assumed to be under the influence for the purposes of this statute if your ability to safely operate a car is “diminished or impaired in the slightest degree.” 

A first conviction can entail a fine of at least $750, two years in prison, or both. If any person dies as a result of the incident that led to the violation, you can be fined up to $10,000 and spend at least one year, but not more than 15 years, in jail. Penalties get stricter for more convictions, such that a fourth or further violation can be punished by a fine of up to $5,000, up to 10 years of prison time, or both. You should also be aware that by driving on Vermont roads, you effectively consent to a breath or blood test for determining if you are under the influence. If you take the test and fail, your license will be suspended for at least 90 days. If you refuse a reasonable request to be tested, your license will be suspended for at least six months. 

Vermont Car Insurance FAQs

Is Car Insurance Required in Vermont?

Yes, Vermont does require auto insurance. You can take out a traditional policy, post a bond, or self-insure.

Which Cars Are Required To Be Insured in Vermont?

Any motor vehicle being operated in Vermont needs to be insured. 

When Should I Get Car Insurance in Vermont?

Vermont law states that new residents have 60 days to register their vehicles after moving, and insurance is required for registration. Therefore, you also have 60 days to get your car insured.

What Happens if My Car Is Not Properly Insured in Vermont?

The penalties for driving without insurance in Vermont include a fine of up to $500 and a suspended or revoked license. Also, you may have to get financial responsibility insurance. 

Is Vermont a No-Fault State?

No, Vermont is an at-fault state. Following an accident, the police or insurance companies will determine which driver caused the accident and assign blame. That driver's insurance is responsible for paying the other party's injuries or damages. 

Do I Need Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Vermont?

Yes, you need uninsured motorist coverage in Vermont. The policy must be for at least $50,000 for one person killed or injured and $100,000 for two or more people. Coverage for property damage by uninsured motorists has to carry a deductible of $150 and is limited to $10,000 per claim.

Is Liability Insurance Required in Vermont?

Yes, you must be covered by liability insurance in Vermont. For bodily injury or death, the minimum coverage is $25,000 for one person and $50,000 for two or more people. The minimum required coverage for property damage is $10,000.

Does Vermont Accept Digital Insurance Cards?

Yes, Vermont accepts digital insurance cards. This can be in the form of an app from your insurance company or an image of your insurance card.

The Best Car Insurance Companies in 2020

Our Car Insurance Ranking

  1.     USAA
  2.     Geico
  3.     Allstate
  4.     State Farm
  5.     Farmers
  6.     Progressive
  7.     American Family
  8.     Nationwide
  9.     Travelers

The Cheapest Car Insurance Companies in 2020

Average Annual Rates:

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Get Cheap Car Insurance Quotes in Your Area

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