While the midwestern state of Missouri has a number of alternative modes of transportation, including four Amtrak routes, 121 public airports, and more than 1,000 miles of navigable rivers, the Missourians who do drive cars need auto insurance.

Missouri has a population of 6.1 million, with 4.2 million licensed drivers and 5.5 million registered vehicles according to the state’s department of transportation.

How much individual drivers pay for car insurance depends on several factors. Car insurance companies consider the year, make, and model of the vehicle its insuring, along with things such as your address, age, gender, marital status, driving record, and credit history. This can be confusing to consumers who simply want to find the best car insurance at the best rate. U.S. News is here to help. Read on, and we’ll help you find the right auto insurance company for you. 

Cheapest Car Insurance Companies in Missouri

How We Found the Cheapest Car Insurance Companies

At U.S. News, we’re all about helping people make life’s important decisions. Our college rankings, launched in 1983, set the standard in educational rankings. Our rankings in other fields, like healthcare, government, and the automotive sphere, help people and thought leaders make choices that make lives better. Now we’re continuing to empower you with the information you need to make the right choices for your life with our Cheapest Car Insurance Rankings. 

Our Study Rates

For this study, U.S. News worked with Quadrant Information Services to analyze a report of insurance rates in all 50 states from the nine largest national car insurance companies, though not every company operates in every state. Quadrant obtained publicly available rate data that car insurers file with state regulators. Our study rates are based on profiles for both male and female drivers aged 25, 35, and 60. Vehicles used include the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150, with annual mileage ranging from 6,000 and 12,000. Three car insurance coverage levels were used, as were credit tiers of good, fair, and poor. Clean driving records and records with one accident, one speeding violation, and one DUI were also used in the calculations of certain driver archetypes. 

Steven Debenport / Getty Images

To get the study rates shown here, we computed the mean rate for male and female drivers aged 25, 35, and 60 who drive 15,000 miles per year and have medium coverage, good credit, and a clean driving record. The rates shown here are for comparative purposes only and should not be considered “average” rates available by individual insurers. Because car insurance rates are based on individual factors, your car insurance rates will differ from the rates shown here. 

How Much Does Car Insurance Cost in Missouri?

See the Cheapest Car Insurance Companies

Our study found that Missouri’s average rates among the top eight national insurers ranged from $704 to $5,886, with the average representative rate landing at $2,296. That’s 62% above the national average rate of $1,416.

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Age

Company

25-year-old male

25-year-old female

35-year-old male

35-year-old female

60-year-old male

60-year-old female

Allstate

$3,083

$2,960

$2,684

$2,657

$2,304

$2,304

American Family

$1,588

$1,364

$1,364

$1,364

$1,213

$1,213

Farmers

$1,973

$1,856

$1,573

$1,577

$1,430

$1,338

Geico

$6,819

$6,528

$6,015

$5,685

$5,328

$4,937

Nationwide

$4,731

$4,299

$3,305

$3,220

$3,061

$2,749

Progressive

$1,785

$1,734

$1,281

$1,387

$1,130

$1,087

State Farm

$1,418

$1,261

$1,144

$1,144

$1,027

$1,027

USAA

$864

$829

$658

$653

$614

$600

Driver profiles for 25-year-old men had the highest rates in our study, with an average yearly representative rate of $2,783. That’s about $180 more than the average 25-year-old female driver profile, which had an average rate of $2,604. By age 35, the average male profile dropped to $2,253 and the average female profile went down to $2,211, according to our study. Driver profiles for 60-year-old men and women had the cheapest rates among these three age groups in Missouri. The average male profile rate was $2,014, while the average female profile was $1,907.

As for individual insurance providers, USAA was the most affordable in Missouri across all age groups, with representative rates ranging from $601 for the 60-year-old female driver profile to $864 for the 25-year-old male driver profile.

After USAA, State Farm, Progressive, American Family, and Farmers all had average rates below $2,000 for driver profiles across all three age groups. Geico was the most expensive by a significant amount across all demographics: Representative rates ranged from $6,820 on average for the 25-year-old male driver profile to $4,938 for the 60-year-old female driver profile. That’s about 145% and 160% above the state average, respectively.

To determine the average rates based on gender and age, we created driver profiles for males and females in each of the following ages: 25 years, 35 years, and 60 years. The profiles also have a clean driving record, insurance coverage for 12,000 miles per year, a medium level of insurance coverage, and a good credit score. We used three vehicles for our driver profiles: the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Mileage

Company

6,000 miles annually

12,000 miles annually

Allstate

$2,665

$2,665

American Family

$1,297

$1,351

Farmers

$1,625

$1,625

Geico

$5,630

$5,885

Nationwide

$3,561

$3,561

Progressive

$1,401

$1,401

State Farm

$1,060

$1,170

USAA

$647

$703

Mileage plays less of a role in your rates than you might think. In Missouri, driver profiles who drive 6,000 miles a year paid an average study rate of $2,235. Our study showed that driver profiles who put 12,000 miles on their car annually paid around $2,295 on average.

USAA had the least expensive rates in these categories. Driver profiles with 6,000 miles annually paid $647 a year on average (71% below the state average), while 12,000-mile driver profiles paid $704, only $57 dollars more. State Farm had the next lowest representative rates of $1,060 for 6,000-mile profiles and $1,171 for 12,000-mile profiles.

Companies with the most expensive driver profile rates in our study were Geico, Nationwide, and Allstate, though the latter two insurers charged the same amount whether driver profiles had 6,000 or 12,000 miles on them. Geico charged an extra $256 for the higher-mileage driver profiles.

We created two driver profiles to compare how annual mileage can change car insurance rates: one with low mileage (6,000 miles per year) and one with high mileage (12,000 miles per year). The profiles covered males and females in the 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old age groups with a medium level of insurance coverage, a good credit score, and a clean driving record. The vehicles used in our study were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Coverage Type

Company

Low

Medium

High

Allstate

$2,604

$2,665

$2,734

American Family

$1,256

$1,351

$1,327

Farmers

$1,552

$1,625

$1,706

Geico

$5,774

$5,885

$6,028

Nationwide

$3,146

$3,561

$3,743

Progressive

$1,249

$1,401

$1,538

State Farm

$1,107

$1,170

$1,247

USAA

$671

$703

$745

In Missouri, our study’s representative rates ranged from an average of $2,170 for low coverage to $2,384 for high coverage.

Our analysis showed that the cheapest car insurance company in this category was USAA. Driver profiles with low coverage had average rates of $671, while those with high coverage paid $746. Those rates are about 68% below the state average. State Farm, Progressive, American Family, and Farmers also had rates below $2,000 and below the state average across coverage types.

According to our study, Geico’s average representative rates were the highest in Missouri. Driver profiles with low coverage paid 166% above the state average, while those with high coverage paid 153% above the state average.

We created identical profiles in our study to represent drivers, then found out how rates changed with the three levels of coverage. The profiles were assigned a clean driving record, a good credit score, and 12,000 miles of annual driving. We used both males and females aged 25, 35, and 60. The 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150 were the vehicles used in our analysis.

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Credit Score

Company

Good

Fair

Poor

Allstate

$2,665

$3,201

$4,599

American Family

$1,351

$1,624

$2,228

Farmers

$1,625

$1,802

$2,600

Geico

$5,885

$6,862

$9,313

Nationwide

$3,561

$4,200

$4,812

Progressive

$1,401

$1,745

$2,468

State Farm

$1,170

$1,394

$2,065

USAA

$703

$802

$1,231

According to our study, the average Missouri driver profile with good credit had a representative rate of $2,296 a year, or about 37% less than the average driver with poor credit, who pays $3,665 annually.

USAA had the cheapest representative rate in Missouri for average driver profiles with good credit: $705 a year, or nearly 70% below the state average. State Farm is the second most affordable with an average rate of $1,171.

Geico had the most expensive rates in these categories, charging $5,886 to driver profiles with good credit and $9,313 to those with poor credit.

Based on profiles of male and female drivers aged 25, 35, and 60, our study verified that credit scores affect car insurance rates. We created a profile for each level of credit score (good, fair, and poor) and assigned the profiles a clean driving record, a good credit score, a medium level of insurance coverage, and 12,000 miles of annual driving. The 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150 were the vehicles used in our analysis.

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Driving Record

Company

Clean record

With 1 speeding violation

With 1 accident

With 1 DUI

Allstate

$2,665

$2,999.28

$3,158.24

$3,415

American Family

$1,351

$1,604

$2,164

$2,314

Farmers

$1,625

$2,005

$2,191

$2,123

Geico

$5,885

$6,588

$7,336

$9,169

Nationwide

$3,561

$4,256

$6,366

$9,946

Progressive

$1,401

$1,747

$2,209

$1,605

State Farm

$1,170

$1,255

$1,340

$1,255

USAA

$703

$778

$901

$1,212

According to our study, the average representative rate for a Missouri driver profile with a clean record was $2,296 a year. That average rate went up to $2,654 for driver profiles with one speeding violation. With one accident, average study rates spiked to $3,209, while one DUI caused rates to jump another $671 to $3,880 on average. Driver profiles with one DUI paid nearly 70% more than those with clean records.

USAA was the cheapest insurance company across the board, costing average driver profiles with clean records $704 annually and those with one DUI $1,212 per year. State Farm also maintained low rates across these categories, with driver profiles with one DUI paying $1,255, or 67% below the state average.

Nationwide and Geico had the highest representative rates in our study, charging driver profiles with one DUI $9,947 and $9,169 respectively. These rates are 156% and 136% above the state average, respectively.

To find out just how much of an effect a person's driving record has on insurance rates, we made driving profiles with a clean record, with one speeding violation, with one accident, and with one instance of driving under the influence (DUI). These driving record representative profiles were based on 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old males and females who drove 12,000 miles per year and had a medium level of insurance coverage and a good credit score. Vehicles used in the analysis were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by City

City

Average Rate

Blue Springs

$2,137

Columbia

$2,130

Independence

$2,413

Kansas City

$2,483

Lee's Summit

$2,231

Springfield

$2,108

St. Charles

$2,196

St. Joseph

$2,254

St. Louis

$3,139

In some states, rates can vary drastically by city. But in Missouri, average insurance rates were fairly flat, according to our study. Among the nine cities we compared, St. Louis was the most expensive to insure a car in. St. Louis residents paid an average of $3,140 per year, or 37% above the state average. Independence and Kansas City are also pricey, costing our average driver profiles $2,415 and $2,485 respectively.

More affordable cities include Springfield, Columbia, St. Charles, and Blue Springs, with average driver profiles rates in the $2,100 range.

Within each state, insurance rates can vary dramatically from city to city. To get a sense of how these differences affect car insurance premiums, we looked at average representative rates across nine of Missouri’s top cities. In our study, we used male and female driver profiles aged 25, 35, and 60 who put 12,000 miles on the odometer each year. Our profiles have medium insurance coverage, a clean driving record, and good credit. We included three vehicles in our study: the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

Missouri Auto Insurance Minimum Coverage Requirements

Like almost every state in the country, Missouri has minimum car insurance coverage requirements. It’s common to require liability insurance, but this state also requires uninsured motorist coverage. Missouri requires the following minimums:

  • Bodily injury liability: $25,000 per person, $50,000 per accident
  • Property damage liability: $25,000 per accident
  • Uninsured motorist: $25,000 per person, $50,000 for bodily injury per accident

Bodily injury liability insurance pays for the medical costs of people hurt in an accident you caused, but it does not cover your own medical costs. Property damage liability insurance pays to repair vehicles (or other property) owned by another person that are damaged in an accident for which you are at fault. Uninsured motorist coverage pays for your medical costs when a driver who doesn't have car insurance causes an accident that injures you.

Cheapest Car Insurance in Missouri

Note: Due to USAA's limited membership, we excluded them from this segment evaluation.

Category

Cheapest Company

Single Young Adult Drivers

State Farm

Married Adult Drivers

State Farm

Senior Drivers

State Farm

Drivers with Good Credit

State Farm

Drivers with Poor Credit

State Farm

Drivers with a Clean Record

State Farm

Drivers with One Speeding Violation

State Farm

Drivers with One Accident

State Farm

Drivers with One DUI

State Farm

Low-mileage Drivers

State Farm

High-mileage Drivers

State Farm

Drivers with Low Coverage

State Farm

Drivers with High Coverage

State Farm

Drivers with Used Cars

State Farm

Drivers with New Cars

State Farm

Of the eight top insurers in our study, the cheapest car insurance company in Missouri is USAA. However, USAA limits its availability to drivers who are affiliated with the military.

Next to USAA, the two most affordable options in Missouri are State Farm and American Family, which offer average driver profiles rates that are 49% and 41% below the state average, respectively.

To find which car insurance company offers the lowest rates, our study used representative driver profiles with good credit, medium insurance coverage, and a clean driving record. Our profiles included males and females aged 25, 35, and 60 who drove 12,000 miles per year. The vehicles used in our study were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

Why Car Insurance Rates Vary in Missouri

High-risk drivers pay the highest car insurance rates, regardless of state. Our study shows that inexperienced drivers and those who have a poor driving record and poor credit history will pay the highest premiums. Older drivers with good credit history and good driving records pay lower rates because they are less likely to be involved in an accident. 

How To Get the Cheapest Car Insurance in Missouri

Most major insurers offer a number of car insurance discounts. For example, having more than one car on your policy or combining your car insurance with your homeowners or renters insurance can lower your rates. You can also often get discounts for younger drivers on your policy if they maintain a B average and qualify for a good student discount. Read more about the cheapest car insurance companies for teens to find even more ways to save when you add a young driver to your policy.

F11photo / Getty Images

Other common ways to lower your car insurance rates include driving safely, increasing your deductible, maintaining good credit, paying premiums in full, low-mileage discounts, and removing collision and comprehensive coverage on older vehicles. Taking a driver’s education class can also help lower car insurance rates. Additionally, there are rate-lowering age milestones in Missouri – turning 21 or 25 can decrease your car insurance rates, as can getting married.

Be sure to shop around when you're looking for a new car insurance policy. The best way to know you're getting the cheapest rate for the best coverage is to compare quotes from different companies.

The most common way to lower your rates and keep them low is to be a good driver with a clean record. Some insurance companies offer discounts if your driving record remains spotless for six months or more. If you get in an accident or receive a citation, though, rates usually go up significantly. 

Important Laws Around Auto Insurance in Missouri

Missouri is a comparative fault state, which means insurance companies can decide what percentage the driver is at fault and make offers to compensate for damage based on an investigation of the accident.

Missouri also requires uninsured motorist coverage in case you get in an accident with someone who doesn’t have car insurance.

Texting While Driving and Distracted Driver Laws in Missouri

In Missouri, texting while driving is illegal for drivers under 21 and could result in a $200 fine and two points being added to your driving record. The points, when added up, can lead to a suspended or revoked license.

DUI Laws in Missouri

Driving under the influence is illegal in Missouri and can cause your car insurance premiums to go up or to be canceled. DUI convictions can stay on a driver’s record for 75 years. A driver’s first DUI can result in a 90-day suspension and two points added to your driving record. Three or more convictions will result in losing your license for 10 years.

Missouri Car Insurance FAQs

Is Car Insurance Required in Missouri?

Yes, all motor vehicle owners are required to maintain liability insurance coverage and uninsured motorist coverage in Missouri.

Which Cars Are Required To Be Insured in Missouri

Any car that is registered to be driven in Missouri needs to be insured, including business vehicles, recreational vehicles, motorcycles, autocycles, buses, and commercial vehicles.

When Should I Get Car Insurance in Missouri?

Missouri drivers are required to show proof of insurance when registering a vehicle and when renewing license plates, and you have 30 days to do so after moving to the state. 

What Happens if My Car Is Not Properly Insured in Missouri?

Driving without insurance can result in your driving privileges and license plates being suspended for up to a year on the third offense.

Is Missouri a No-Fault State?

Missouri is a comparative fault state. Pure comparative fault allows a driver’s damages to be reduced by the percentage the driver is at fault in a loss. Insurers are allowed to investigate an accident to determine the percentage of fault of the drivers involved. Companies can make voluntary offers based on this opinion.

Do I Need Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Missouri?

Yes, Missouri law requires drivers to carry uninsured motorist coverage of $25,000 for bodily injury per person and $50,000 for bodily injury per accident.

Is Liability Insurance Required in Missouri?

Yes, liability insurance is required in Missouri. The shorthand for the required minimum coverage in Missouri is 25/50/25: $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability coverage, $50,000 bodily injury liability coverage per accident, and $25,000 property damage liability coverage per accident. 

Does Missouri Accept Digital Insurance Cards?

Yes, Missouri law allows you to use a digital insurance card.

The Best Car Insurance Companies in 2020

Our Car Insurance Ranking

  1.     USAA
  2.     Geico
  3.     Allstate
  4.     State Farm
  5.     Farmers
  6.     Progressive
  7.     American Family
  8.     Nationwide
  9.     Travelers

The Cheapest Car Insurance Companies in 2020

Average Annual Rates:

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