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While the midwestern state of Missouri has a number of alternative modes of transportation including four Amtrak routes, 121 public airports, and more than 1,000 miles of navigable rivers, the Missourians who do drive cars need auto insurance.

Missouri has a population of 6.1 million, but has 4.2 million licensed drivers and 5.5 million registered vehicles according to the state’s department of transportation.

How much individual drivers pay for car insurance depends on a number of factors. Car insurance companies take into account the year, make, and model of the vehicle along with a driver’s address, stability, age, gender, marital status, driving history, license status, credit information, prior insurance, and vehicle along with other drivers in the household.

Compared to our study’s national rates, Missourian driver profiles pay car insurance rates a little lower than the national average across a number of national providers.

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On average, it costs $1,179 to insure a car in Missouri according to our study, with our driver profiles saving nearly $150 compared to the national average representative rate of $1,320.

USAA is the cheapest car insurance in the nation in 2019 according to our data, with a national average representative rate of $895 for the driver profiles used in our study. In Missouri, driver profiles pay an average of $740 for USAA, according to our survey.

Due to USAA’s limited membership for military affiliations, it is worth noting Nationwide insurance has the second-cheapest representative rates in Missouri according to our study, with an average driver profile paying $916 a year. Geico is also reasonable in Missouri, costing average driver profiles $974 annually.

When insured by Missouri’s most expensive car insurance company in our study, Allstate, average driver profiles in the study pay $1,584 a year.

Cheapest Car Insurance Companies in Missouri

The rates shown here are based on a study performed by Quadrant Information Services on behalf of U.S. News. The study examined rates from nine largest car insurance companies in the United States, using certain driver profiles. Your rates will differ.

How We Found the Cheapest Car Insurance in Missouri

At U.S. News, we’re all about helping people make life’s important decisions. Our college rankings, launched in 1983, set the standard in educational rankings. Our ranking in other fields, like healthcare, government, and the automotive sphere, help people and thought leaders make choices that make lives better. Now we’re continuing to empower you with the information you need to make the right choices for your life with our Cheapest Car Insurance Rankings.

Our Study Rates

For this study, U.S. News worked with Quadrant Information Services to analyze a report of insurance rates in all 50 states from the 10 largest national car insurance companies, though not every company operates in every state Quadrant obtained publicly available rate data that car insurers file with state regulators. Our study rates are based on profiles for both male and female drivers aged 25, 35, and 60. Vehicles used include the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford-F-150, with annual mileage ranging from 6,000 and 12,000. 

Three car insurance coverage levels were used, as were credit tiers of good, fair, and poor. Clean driving records and records with one accident, one speeding violation, and one DUI were also used in the calculations of certain driver archetypes. To get the state-wide study rates shown here, we computed the mean rate for male and female drivers ages 25, 35 and 60 who drive 12,000 miles per year, have medium coverage, good credit and a clean driving record. The rates shown here are for comparative purposes only and should not be considered “average” rates available by individual insurers. Because car insurance rates are based on individual factors, your car insurance rates will differ from the rates shown here.

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How Much Does Car Insurance Cost in Missouri?

See the Cheapest Car Insurance Companies

Missouri is one of the states with car insurance on the more affordable side by a few hundred dollars. Our study found Missouri’s average rates from the top eight national insurers ranged from about $740 to $1,580. Among the eight providers, the average car insurance representative rate in Missouri is $1,180.

National rates in our study from the top nine car insurance providers range between $895 to $1,780, with the average cost being $1,320. 

Bear in mind that the rates mentioned in this article are only representative driver profile averages, not the exact amount you should expect to pay. A wide range of factors contribute to the premiums charged by car insurance companies. 

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Age

To find out how much car insurance costs in Missouri are affected by age, our study used representative driver profiles with good credit, medium insurance coverage, a clean driving record, and 12,000 miles of annual mileage. Our profiles included men and women drivers of the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

In Missouri, the driver profile of a 25-year-old man paid an average of $1,385 a year. That’s about $100 more than the average 25-year-old woman driver profile, who paid an average of $1,285. By age 35 it evens out, with the average male profile paying $1,167 and the average female profile paying $1,169 according to our study. Driver profiles who are age 60 can get insured the most cheaply of all age groups in Missouri according to our study, with the average male profile paying $1,065 and the average female profile paying $1,005.

As for individual insurance providers, USAA is the most affordable in Missouri across age groups, with representative rates ranging from $630 for a 60-year-old woman driver profile to $945 for a 25-year-old man driver profile. 

After USAA, Geico is the second-cheapest insurance for the average 25-year-old driver profile at about $1,000 in our study for both men and women. However, Nationwide is the second-cheapest for average driver profiles in the age 35 and age 60 profile groups, with study rates ranging from $750 for the 60-year-old woman driver profile to $900 for a 35-year-old man driver profile in Missouri.

Company

25-year-old male

25-year-old female

35-year-old male

35-year-old female

60-year-old male

60-year-old female

Allstate

$1,634.63

$1,586.50

$1,601.64

$1,648.85

$1,538.61

$1,494.53

American Family

$1,449.39

$1,238.06

$1,238.06

$1,238.06

$1,099.12

$1,099.12

Farmers

$1,789.27

$1,694.07

$1,439.12

$1,443.76

$1,312.60

$1,222.54

Geico

$1,002.53

$993.52

$1,099.69

$998.34

$976.33

$773.02

Nationwide

$1,131.15

$1,026.32

$896.86

$871.85

$815.50

$755.14

Progressive

$1,611.57

$1,565.68

$1,163.45

$1,252.73

$1,020.93

$984.97

State Farm

$1,507.41

$1,336.27

$1,211.76

$1,211.76

$1,088.18

$1,088.18

USAA

$941.47

$847.79

$692.43

$694.32

$650.05

$633.32

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Credit Score

We also wanted to discover the difference a good credit score can make compared to a poor credit score. We used driver profiles in three categories: good credit, fair credit, and poor credit. Men and women ages 25, 35, and 60 were profiled as drivers. Each profile had medium insurance coverage, a clean driving record, and 12,000 miles of annual mileage, and for vehicle baselines we used the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

In Missouri, an average driver profile with good credit pays a study rate of $1,180 a year, according to our study – about $1,000 less than the average driver with poor credit, who pays $2,165.

USAA has the cheapest representative rate in Missouri for average driver profiles who have good credit, according to our study, at $743 yearly. Nationwide and then Geico are also affordable, costing an average driver profile with good credit $916 and $974, respectively, in Missouri. 

Allstate is by far the most expensive insurance by credit score in Missouri, according to our driver profiles, who paid between $1,585 with good credit to $2,892 with poor credit on average.

Company

Good

Fair

Poor

Allstate

$1,584.13

$1,888.88

$2,892.15

American Family

$1,226.97

$1,457.44

$2,082.14

Farmers

$1,483.56

$1,686.35

$2,527.37

Geico

$973.91

$1,207.23

$1,830.48

Nationwide

$916.14

$1,039.77

$1,260.82

Progressive

$1,266.56

$1,579.50

$2,340.25

State Farm

$1,240.59

$1,480.07

$2,195.10

USAA

$743.23

$1,027.04

$2,191.36

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Driving Record

In our study, we analysed the effect driving history can have on car insurance rates in Missouri. We used driver profiles who are men and women aged 25, 35, and 60 with good credit, medium insurance coverage, and 12,000 miles of annual driving. The vehicles used were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

According to our study, the average representative rate for a driver profile with a clean record in Missouri is $1,180 a year. A driver profile with one speeding violation paid an average study rate of $1,360. With one accident, average study rates spike to $1,625 – and spike another $100 with one DUI to $1,750 on average, according to our study.

Our study showed USAA as the cheapest insurance for those with any record, costing average driver profiles with clean records $743 annually, ranging up to $1,260 for those with one DUI. 

Allstate, American Family, and Nationwide all cost more than $2,000 for those with one DUI, although Nationwide is among the most affordable for average driver profiles with clean records, with study rates under $1,000 along with Geico and USAA.

Company

Clean record

With 1 speeding violation

With 1 accident

With 1 DUI

Allstate

$1,584.13

$1,759.96

$1,853.27

$2,121.97

American Family

$1,226.97

$1,452.85

$1,940.71

$2,085.09

Farmers

$1,483.56

$1,831.63

$2,013.43

$1,950.90

Geico

$973.91

$1,065.24

$1,406.88

$1,732.11

Nationwide

$916.14

$1,041.39

$1,416.63

$2,061.89

Progressive

$1,266.56

$1,588.41

$1,996.72

$1,465.27

State Farm

$1,240.59

$1,331.11

$1,421.65

$1,331.11

USAA

$743.23

$819.06

$945.57

$1,263.16

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Coverage Type

Most major insurers offer car insurance coverage in three general tiers: low, medium, and high (even if they don’t necessarily advertise it as such). We created identical profiles in our study to represent drivers, then found out how study rates changed with the three levels of coverage. The profiles were assigned a clean driving record, a good credit score, and 12,000 miles of annual driving. We used both males and females with the ages of 25, 35, and 60. The 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150 are the vehicles used in our analysis. 

In Missouri, our study’s representative rates range from an average of $1,100 for low coverage to $1,240 for high coverage.

Our analysis shows the cheapest car insurance company in Missouri by coverage strength is USAA, costing between $710 to $790 for the average driver profile. Nationwide is also a good deal, with prices ranging from $850 to $965, according to our representative rates. Geico ranks as the third-most affordable car insurance in Missouri by coverage type, with average drivers paying representative rates ranging from $910 to $1,035.

The study said the most expensive car insurance by coverage type in Missouri are from Allstate and Farmers, ranging from $1,530 to $1,645 from Allstate and $1,410 to $1,570 from Farmers for our average driver profile.

The about $130 increase per year on average from low to high coverage is probably worth it considering how much more you could end up paying if you cause an accident and have minimum coverage.

Company

Low

Medium

High

Allstate

$1,533.95

$1,584.13

$1,644.68

American Family

$1,144.87

$1,226.97

$1,195.54

Farmers

$1,408.91

$1,483.56

$1,567.86

Geico

$911.66

$973.91

$1,036.31

Nationwide

$851.01

$916.14

$964.97

Progressive

$1,139.20

$1,266.56

$1,380.93

State Farm

$1,162.12

$1,240.59

$1,319.41

USAA

$709.31

$743.23

$787.91

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by Annual Mileage

We created two driver profiles to compare how annual mileage can change car insurance representative rates in Missouri: one with low mileage (6,000 miles per year) and one with high mileage (12,000 miles per year). The profiles covered males and females in the 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old age groups with a medium level of insurance coverage, a good credit score, and a clean driving record. The vehicles used in our study were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

As for mileage in terms of car insurance payments, driver profiles who drive about 6,000 miles a year pay an average study rate of $1,145 in Missouri. Driver profiles who put about 12,000 miles on their car annually, pay around $1,180 on average, the study shows.

For our USAA driver profiles, those with 6,000 miles annually paid $680 compared to those with 12,000 miles who paid $743 – the most affordable in Missouri, according to our study.

Geico and Nationwide are also affordable, costing average driver profiles with the 6,000-mile commute about $935 and $916 on average. Nationwide’s average driver profile rates in our study don’t change with the 12,000-mile commute, but Geico’s rates increase to $975. 

Allstate is the most expensive car insurance by commute in Missouri according to our study, with commuter profiles paying averages of $1,585 in both annual mileage ranges. Farmers is also pricey, costing an average of $1,485 in both categories.

Company

6,000 miles annually

12,000 miles annually

Allstate

$1,584.13

$1,584.13

American Family

$1,177.37

$1,226.97

Farmers

$1,483.56

$1,483.56

Geico

$936.75

$973.91

Nationwide

$916.13

$916.14

Progressive

$1,266.55

$1,266.56

State Farm

$1,124.58

$1,240.59

USAA

$682.93

$743.23

Missouri Car Insurance Rates by City

We checked our study's driver profiles in some of Missouri's largest cities to find out how city of residence can affect insurance study rates. Our profiles are based on 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old males and females with a clean driving record, 12,000 miles of mileage per year, a medium level of insurance coverage, and a good credit score. Vehicles used in the analysis are the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150. 

Rates can vary drastically by city in some states, but in Missouri average insurance rates in our analysis were fairly flat in the cities we studied. Changes in average insurance rates can be caused by areas with high crime, high traffic, or high likelihood of accidents – generally found higher in denser areas.

In Missouri, St. Louis is the most expensive city in which to insure a car, costing our average driver profiles $1,623. Independence and Kansas City are also pricey, costing our average driver profiles $1,240 and $1,295 respectively.

More affordable cities costing average driver profiles rates in the $1,100 range include Springfield, Columbia, Lee’s Summit, O’Fallon, St. Joseph, St. Charles, and Blue Springs, according to our study.

City

Average Rate

Kansas City

$1,293.83

St. Louis

$1,622.71

Springfield

$1,132.37

Columbia

$1,115.73

Independence

$1,237.46

Lee's Summit

$1,162.87

O'Fallon

$1,136.62

St. Joseph

$1,163.70

St. Charles

$1,150.64

Blue Springs

$1,153.64

Missouri Auto Insurance Minimum Coverage Requirements

Like almost every state in the country, Missouri has minimum car insurance coverage requirements. It’s common to require liability insurance, which Oregon does, but this state also requires uninsured motorist coverage. These are the minimum required insurance limits in Missouri:

  • Bodily injury liability: $25,000 per person, $50,000 per accident

  • Property damage liability: $25,000 per accident

  • Uninsured motorist: $25,000 per person, $50,000 for bodily injury per accident

Bodily injury liability insurance pays for the medical costs of people hurt in an accident you caused, but it does not cover your own medical costs. Property damage liability insurance pays to repair vehicles (or other property) owned by another person that are damaged in an accident in which you are at fault. Uninsured motorist coverage pays for your medical costs when a driver who doesn't have car insurance causes an accident that injures you.

Cheapest Car Insurance in Missouri

Note: Due to USAA's limited membership, we excluded them from this segment evaluation.

Category

Cheapest Company

Drivers with a Military Affiliation

USAA

Single Young Adult Drivers

Geico

Married Adult Drivers

Nationwide

Senior Drivers

Nationwide

Drivers with Good Credit

Nationwide

Drivers with Poor Credit

Nationwide

Drivers with a Clean Record

Nationwide

Drivers with One Speeding Violation

Nationwide

Drivers with One Accident

Geico

Drivers with One DUI

State Farm

Low-mileage Drivers

Nationwide

High-mileage Drivers

Nationwide

Drivers with Low Coverage

Nationwide

Drivers with High Coverage

Nationwide

Drivers with Used Cars

Nationwide

Drivers with New Cars

Nationwide

To find which car insurance company offers the lowest rates in Missouri, our study used representative driver profiles with good credit, medium insurance coverage, a clean driving record, and 12,000 miles of annual driving. Our profiles included male and females with the ages of 25, 35, and 60. The vehicles used in our study are the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150.

According to our study, the cheapest car insurance company in Missouri of the top eight national insurers is USAA, with the average driver profile paying $743 annually. However, USAA limits its availability to drivers who are members of the military, veterans, or their families.

Next to USAA, the two most affordable options in Missouri are Nationwide and Geico, costing the average driver profile $916 and $970 respectively each year.

Why Car Insurance Rates Vary in Missouri

The highest risk drivers pay the highest car insurance rates, regardless of state. The Quadrant Information Services study shows that inexperienced drivers, those in high risk areas, or those who have a history of poor driving or financial irresponsibility will pay the highest premiums. Older drivers with good credit history and good driving records pay lower rates because they are less likely to be involved in an accident.

Legal requirements, traffic congestion, economic conditions, weather, and competition are some of the top factors that lead to different rates. 

F11photo / Getty Images

How to Get the Cheapest Car Insurance in Missouri

Most major insurers offer discounts on car insurance for those who bundle policies. Having more than one car on your policy or combining your car insurance with your homeowners or renters insurance can lower your rates. You can also often get discounts for younger drivers on your policy if they maintain a B average and qualify for a good student discount. Read more about the cheapest car insurance companies for teens to find even more ways to save when you add a young driver to your policy.

In Missouri, common ways to lower insurance rates include driving safely, increasing your deductible, maintaining good credit, vehicle safety and anti-theft discounts, multiple vehicle discounts, paying premiums in full, bundling with home or renters insurance, low-mileage discounts, and removing collision and comprehensive coverage on older vehicles, according to the state driver’s manual. Students who earn good grades and take a driver’s education class can help lower car insurance rates as well, and there are also rate-lowering age milestones in Missouri – turning 21 or 25 can decrease your car insurance rates, as can getting married.

Be sure to shop around when you're looking for a new car insurance policy. The best way to know you're getting the cheapest rate for the best coverage is to compare quotes from different companies.

The most common way to lower your rates and keep them low is to be a good driver with a clean record. Some insurance companies offer discounts if your driving record remains spotless for six months or more. Once you have an accident or a citation, though, rates usually go up significantly. 

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Important Laws Around Auto Insurance in Missouri

Missouri is a comparative fault state, which means insurance companies can decide what percentage the driver is at fault and make offers to compensate for damage based on an investigation of the accident.

Missouri also requires uninsured motorist coverage, in case you get in an accident with someone who doesn’t have car insurance.

Digital insurance cards are accepted in Missouri.

artisteer / Getty Images
artisteer / Getty Images

Missouri Driving Laws and Punishments

In Missouri, texting and driving is illegal for drivers under age 21, and could result in a $200 fine and two points being added to your driving record. The points, when adding up, can lead to a suspended or revoked license. 

Driving under the influence is illegal in Missouri, and can cause car insurance premiums to go up or your insurance to be canceled. DWI convictions can stay on a driver’s record for 75 years. A driver’s first DWI can result in a 90-day suspension and two points to your driving record. Three or more convictions will result in a 10-year license denial. 

Missouri Car Insurance FAQs

Is car insurance required in Missouri?

Yes, all motor vehicle owners are required to maintain motor vehicle liability insurance coverage and uninsured motorist coverage in Missouri.

Which cars are required to be insured in Missouri?

Any car that is registered to be driven in Missouri needs to be insured, including business vehicles, recreational vehicles, motorcycles, motortricycles, autocycles, buses and commercial vehicles.

When should I get car insurance in Missouri?

Missouri drivers are required to show proof of insurance when registering a vehicle and when renewing license plates, and you have 30 days to do so after moving to the state. 

What happens if my car is not properly insured in Missouri?

Driving without insurance can result in your driving privileges and license plates being suspended in Missouri, for up to a year on the third offense.

Is Missouri a no-fault state?

Missouri is actually a comparative fault state since 1983. Pure comparative fault allows a driver’s damages to be reduced by the percentage the driver is at fault in a loss. Insurers are allowed to investigate an accident and make a decision as to the percentage of fault of the drivers involved, and can make voluntary offers based on this opinion. 

Do I need uninsured motorist coverage in Missouri?

Yes, Missouri law requires drivers to carry uninsured motorist coverage of $25,000 for bodily injury per person and $50,000 for bodily injury per accident.

Is liability insurance required in Missouri?

Yes, liability insurance is required in Missouri. The shorthand for the required minimum coverage in Missouri is 25/50/25: $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability coverage, $50,000 bodily injury liability coverage per accident, and $25,000 property damage liability coverage per accident. 

Does Missouri accept digital insurance cards?

Yes, Missouri law allows you to use a digital insurance card.