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Deals by Manufacturer

Best Lease Deals This Month

Deals are samples from the manufacturer. Availability may vary based on location. Contact your dealer for details and qualification. All prices exclude taxes, licensing, tags and other dealer fees.

2021 Genesis G70

2021 Genesis G70

MSRP: $36,000-$48,200

2021 Genesis G70

LEASE DEALS

  • $329 per month for 36 months with $3,439 due at signing (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 Honda Civic

2021 Honda Civic

MSRP: $21,050-$43,995

2021 Honda Civic

LEASE DEALS

  • $260 per month for 36 months with zero due at signing (Northeast, Midwest, Southwest)
    $189 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing (Northeast, Midwest, Southwest)
    $199 per month for 36 months with $2,899 due at signing (Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, South Central, Northwest)
    (Expires: 05/03/21)
2021 Hyundai Sonata

2021 Hyundai Sonata

MSRP: $23,600-$33,850

2021 Hyundai Sonata

LEASE DEALS

  • $229 per month for 36 months with zero due at signing (Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest)
    $259 per month for 36 months with zero due at signing (Southeast, South Central, Northwest)
    (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 Jeep Gladiator

2021 Jeep Gladiator

MSRP: $33,545-$43,875

Get an additional $500 bonus cash »

2021 Jeep Gladiator

LEASE DEALS

  • $199 per month for 24 months with $3,849 due at signing on Sport (Northeast)
    $239 per month for 36 months with $3,199 due at signing on Sport (Mid-Atlantic)
    $289 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing on Sport S (Southeast)
    $268 per month for 36 months with $3,995 due at signing on Sport (Midwest, South Central, Southwest, Northwest)
    (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 Kia Soul

2021 Kia Soul

MSRP: $17,490-$27,550

2021 Kia Soul

LEASE DEALS

  • $169 per month for 36 months with $2,299 due at signing (Northeast)
    $169 per month for 24 months with $2,299 due at signing (Northeast)
    $169 per month for 36 months with $2,799 due at signing (Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest, South Central, Southwest, Northwest)
    $169 per month for 24 months with $2,799 due at signing (Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest, South Central, Southwest, Northwest)
    (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 Lexus UX

2021 Lexus UX

MSRP: $32,900-$37,600

2021 Lexus UX

LEASE DEALS

  • $329 per month for 36 months with $1,999 due at signing and no first month’s payment (Northeast, Mid-Atlantic)
    $329 per month for 36 months with $2,099 due at signing and no first month’s payment (Southeast, South Central)
    $329 per month for 36 months with $499 due as signing and no first month’s payment (Midwest)
    $329 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing and no first month’s payment (Southwest, Northwest)
    (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 Mazda Mazda3

2021 Mazda Mazda3

MSRP: $20,500-$33,750

2021 Mazda Mazda3

LEASE DEALS

  • $183 per month for 36 months with $2,499 due at signing (Northeast, Southeast, South Central)
    $203 per month for 36 months with $2,499 due at signing (Mid-Atlantic, Northwest)
    $199 per month for 36 months with $2,499 due at signing (Midwest)
    $179 per month for 36 months with $2,499 due at signing (Southwest)
    (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 MINI Cooper

2021 MINI Cooper

MSRP: $22,400-$44,900

2021 MINI Cooper

LEASE DEALS

  • $209 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing (two-door)
    $239 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing (four-door)
    (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 Nissan Altima

2021 Nissan Altima

MSRP: $24,300-$34,100

2021 Nissan Altima

LEASE DEALS

  • $229 per month for 36 months with $2,779 due at signing (Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Northwest)
    $189 per month for 36 months with $3,539 due at signing (Northeast)
    $229 per month for 36 months with $2,379 due at signing (Southeast)
    $229 per month for 36 months with $3,179 due at signing (South Central)
    (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 Subaru Outback

2021 Subaru Outback

MSRP: $26,795-$39,945

2021 Subaru Outback

LEASE DEALS

  • $249 per month for 36 months with $2,499 due at signing (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 Toyota Camry

2021 Toyota Camry

MSRP: $24,970-$35,545

2021 Toyota Camry

LEASE DEALS

  • $189 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing and no first month’s payment (Northeast)
    $239 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing and no first month’s payment (Mid-Atlantic)
    $209 per month for 36 months with $3,508 due at signing (Southeast)
    $229 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing and no first month’s payment (Midwest)
    $315 per month for 36 months with zero due at signing (Midwest)
    $259 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing (South Central)
    $249 per month for 36 months with $1,999 due at signing (Southwest)
    $239 per month for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing and no first month’s payment (Northwest)
    (Expires: 03/31/21)
2021 Volkswagen Tiguan

2021 Volkswagen Tiguan

MSRP: $25,245-$39,095

2021 Volkswagen Tiguan

LEASE DEALS

  • $309 per month for 39 months with zero due at signing on S 4Motion (Northeast)
    $309 per month for 39 months with zero due at signing on S (Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest, South Central)
    $339 per month for 39 months with zero due at signing on S 4Motion (Northwest)
    $279 per month for 39 months with zero due at signing on S (Southwest)
    (Expires: 03/31/21)

More on Best Lease Deals

With rising new car prices, affordable transportation is getting harder to find. Even used car prices are climbing as commuters look for alternatives to mass transit. One way to stretch your car budget is by leasing instead of buying. You can get the latest safety, infotainment, and comfort features with monthly payments that are lower than if you were to finance the purchase of the same car.

Payments can be even lower if you take advantage of an automaker’s special lease deal. Though it can be complicated, leasing doesn’t need to be scary. With the right information to confidently lease a car, you can negotiate a great lease and save significant money each month.

Once the realm of businesses and luxury car shoppers, leasing now spans the market. You can lease anything from the smallest subcompact car to the largest full-size pickup. According to the credit bureau Experian, about three in 10 cars leaving car lots are leased rather than purchased.

Leasing a car is like renting it for a long time. You never really own it. When the lease term is up, you just take it back to the dealership where you got it, pay some lease-end costs, and walk away.

So why is leasing cheaper? Most shoppers have to take out a loan to buy a new vehicle. When you do, you have to pay for the car's entire value. When you lease, you only pay for the amount of depreciation that is expected to occur over the term of the lease, plus interest and fees. Since you’re only paying for a portion of the vehicle’s value, your monthly payments are usually lower.

When cars and trucks aren’t selling at the pace automakers and their dealers want them to, they put them on sale by offering special deals. In addition to car purchase deals, such as low-interest financing and cash back offers, they also roll out lease incentives with lower than normal monthly payments, smaller than usual amounts due at signing, or both.

While the concept of leasing is simple, the process of choosing, negotiating, and finalizing a lease can be a daunting challenge if you have never leased a new car before. It even has a vocabulary that’s different than the rest of the car-buying world. The team at U.S. News Best Cars is here to help you with the knowledge to confidently pursue a lease. Our articles on deciding whether to buy or lease, strategies to avoid expensive leasing errors, and our step-by-step guide on how to lease will guide you through a successful new car leasing experience.

What Are the Best Lease Deals This March?

With a microchip shortage starting to put a crimp in the world’s auto production, many automakers have cut back on their purchase and lease incentives this month. There are still many great deals to be found, though, including several with nothing due at signing or no first month’s payment.

Deals with nothing (other than taxes and fees) due upfront include offers on the 2021 Honda Civic, 2021 Volkswagen Tiguan, and 2021 Hyundai Sonata. Though the monthly payments tend to be a bit high with these deals, you don’t have to save up for a down payment.

Shoppers with tight monthly budgets can find deals with payments of less than $200 per month on vehicles such as the 2021 Mazda3, 2021 Kia Soul, and even the 2021 Toyota Camry in some parts of the country. There are even affordable lease deals available on the 2021 Jeep Gladiator pickup.

Looking for something a little more luxurious? There are excellent deals available this March on the 2021 Genesis G70 and 2021 Lexus UX.

Not all car lease offers are available everywhere or on all models of a specific vehicle. Many are restricted to customers who live in a certain area and to a certain number of cars in a dealer’s inventory. Unlike car purchase deals, new vehicle lease deals are almost always limited to cars with precise trim levels and option packages. While leasing generally favors customers with good credit, lease specials frequently raise the bar even higher; only consumers with top-notch credit qualify for the best offers.

Our Best Price Program can connect you with dealers who can help you identify the best lease deals you can take advantage of.

You normally want to negotiate the price that your lease is based on (its capitalized cost, in leasing terms). Though, with car lease deals, you should not be surprised to see the sticker price listed on your documents, with a "cap cost reduction" to bring it down.

How Do You Lease a Car?

Just like when you purchase and finance a car, the first step in leasing is finding a vehicle that meets your needs and fits your budget. Simply put, it doesn't matter how great the deal is if you are not getting a great car. Our new car rankings and reviews will guide you on the path to finding the right ride.

You also need to have a good idea of how much you drive each year. All leases have strict mileage caps and will become very expensive if you go over the limit. You don't want to be way under your mileage threshold, either. The cost of the expected mileage is built into the lease, so you don't want to pay for miles you won't use.

Usually when you lease, you can negotiate the vehicle cost, the mileage cap, the length of the lease, and other lease components. When you get a special lease deal, most of the terms are set in stone, with no room for negotiation. By accepting those terms, you're likely getting a lower price than if you were negotiating the lease with the dealer.

Costs that are priced into the lease include the amount of depreciation that is expected to occur while you have the vehicle, along with interest and fees. When the contract is over, you drop off the car back at the dealership and pay for any excess mileage, wear, or other closing costs.

The amount of depreciation is determined by subtracting the vehicle’s expected value, called its residual value, from its capitalized cost, or price. The residual value is an expert’s opinion of the car’s future value and is generally not negotiable. The depreciation, plus interest and fees, is then divided between an amount due at signing, and the remainder is split into a series of monthly payments.

To illustrate, we'll use an SUV with an MSRP of $40,000, and the vehicle is expected to be worth $25,000 at the end of a three-year lease. As a lessee, you'll have to cover the $15,000 in expected depreciation, plus some interest (known as the money factor) and fees. If $3,000 is due at lease signing, the remainder ($12,000 plus interest and fees) is divided into a series of 35 equal monthly payments.

To convert the money factor to a more easily comparable interest rate, multiply it by 2,400. If the money factor is .0025, you can multiply it by 2,400 to see that it is equivalent to an interest rate of 6%.

The amount you pay in sales tax can have a significant effect on your decision to lease or buy. In many jurisdictions, you only have to pay sales tax on the amount you spend up front and on the monthly payments. When you buy a car, you have to pay tax on its entire value. If you are unclear about the tax implications of leasing a car, you should check with your financial advisor or accountant rather than relying on the knowledge of a car salesperson.

What Else Do You Need to Know About Leasing?

Having a reasonable estimate of your annual mileage is essential before you even think about leasing. If you own a car, you can drive as few or as many miles as you want with no consequences. If you go over the mileage cap on a lease, you can expect to pay between 15 and 50 cents for every mile you drive. That money has to be paid to the dealer at the end of the lease.

Overestimating the number of miles that you drive also has financial implications. If you have a lease with a cap of 36,000 miles, those miles are figured into the amount of depreciation that is expected during the contract. If you only drive 20,000 of the allowed 36,000 miles, you have essentially paid for the depreciation on 16,000 miles that you didn't drive. You can avoid the over-or-under mileage situations by having a good idea of your mileage before you consider leasing a vehicle.

If you own a car, you can customize it as much as you want, but that's not the case when leasing. You are expected to return the car in the exact condition it left the showroom in, with only reasonable wear and tear. Even if you think your modifications add value to the vehicle, you'll have to remove them before you return it, or you’ll face the cost of having the dealership return it to showroom condition. Dealerships also expect records from lease customers so that they know that the car has been appropriately maintained. Some lease offers include periodic maintenance, while others require you to pay for it yourself.

Every lease is different, so you must read the documents before you sign them. Pay particular attention to the sales price (capitalized cost), money factor, term, payment, and mileage cap. Some leases require you to pay a security deposit at signing. The security deposit goes toward any damage or excess mileage charges due when you return the vehicle at the end of the lease.

If you see anything that is incorrect or doesn’t match the deal you agreed to, don’t sign the documents.

Nearly all lease agreements require lessees to have gap insurance to cover their loss if the vehicle is totaled or stolen. Even if the lease does not require it, it's a great idea to have it. You should shop for gap coverage before you head for the dealer, as you don’t have to buy it there. Most car insurers will sell you gap coverage, as will many banks and credit unions, whether or not you have any financing with them.

A top benefit of leasing is that you usually don't have to worry about costly repairs. Most lease contracts are shorter than vehicle warranties, so the manufacturer should cover any major issues with the vehicle. Some leases even include basic maintenance. Of course, lessees are responsible for buying their own fuel and auto insurance.

At the end of the lease, you’ll take the car back to the dealership you got it from or another of the brand’s franchised dealerships if the lease contract allows it. You’ll have to pay excess mileage charges, along with fees for excess wear and costs to repair any damage. If you paid a security deposit, these costs will be deducted from that amount. Some leases have a disposition fee that you pay when you return the car, which some brands waive if you sign another lease with the automaker.

It’s common for lessees to buy their vehicles at the end of the contract. Still, you'll want to treat it like any other used car purchase and compare its sale price with the price of similar cars in the marketplace. This will help ensure that you’re getting a good deal. Since you have no ownership interest in the car, you should not expect to get any money back at the end of the lease to put toward your next vehicle.

Leasing and Credit

If you plan to lease, you're going to need good credit. For a manufacturer-subsidized lease deal, it needs to be stellar. You will also need to show a stable employment history, which helps assure the leasing company that you will make your payments. It's possible to lease with bad credit, but it's more costly and challenging than if your credit is good.

It is a good idea to check your credit reports for errors and negative information well before you start looking at vehicles. It takes time to correct mistakes and build your score, so the earlier you start, the more chance you have of having a higher score when the time comes to lease. The worst time to find out about an issue with your credit is when you’re sitting in a dealer’s finance office.

How Do I Know If It Is a Deal?

Naturally, not every offer advertised is a good deal. Many consumers don’t look beyond the monthly payment to compare offers, but that’s a potentially costly leasing error. Instead, look at the total cost of the lease, including all payments and the amount due at signing. It's a good idea to do the simple math yourself so that you understand the numbers and ensure that no costly add-ons have wormed their way into the deal.

To determine the total cost of a lease, multiply the monthly payment by one less than the number of months in the lease term. You subtract one because the first payment is usually included in the amount due when you sign the lease. Add the total of the payments to the amount you have to pay upfront (including fees), and you have the total cost of the contract.

When you know how to find the total cost of a lease, it’s easy to compare multiple offers. We’ll show you how, using a pair of offers on highly ranked compact cars from this month’s advertised lease deals.

In some parts of the country, you can lease a 2021 Mazda3 for three years with payments of $179 per month and with $2,499 due at signing. Let’s look at how that compares to the offer on the 2021 Honda Civic, with payments of $260 per month for three years and zero due at signing. Both deals allow you to drive 10,000 miles before excess mileage fees accrue.

Since there’s nothing (other than taxes and fees) due upfront with the Honda Civic deal, you can just multiply its $260 payment by 35 (one less than the 36 months in the lease term). The total cost of its lease is $9,100. To find the cost of the Mazda3 deal, we’ll multiply $179 by 35, then add the $2,499 down payment. It works out to a total cost of $8,764.

Even though you have to pay a chunk of money upfront, the Mazda deal is less expensive in the long run. Of course, since the numbers are pretty close, you’ll want to choose the vehicle that best fits your needs and lifestyle.

Leasing is usually less expensive than purchasing, at least in the short term. If you are considering a longer-term commitment, you should explore our car deals page before making your final lease-versus-buy decision. Some generous financing or cash-back offers can bring the total cost of buying closer to that of leasing than you might think.

If having the latest and greatest technology isn’t paramount to your vehicle choice, you might consider a certified pre-owned car (CPO car), which gives you the benefits of car ownership at a much lower cost than that of purchasing a new vehicle. Our used car deals page shows the best incentives on CPO cars offered by automakers.

If you didn’t see your dream car in the list of vehicles above, look at our Acura, BMW, Cadillac, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, Audi, Toyota, Nissan, Ford, Honda, Chevrolet, Hyundai, Kia, Mazda, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, Buick, GMC, Subaru, Lexus, Lincoln, Volvo, Infiniti, and Volkswagen deals pages to see brand-specific lease specials.

While we strive to keep the deals listed here up to date, these lease offers can change and may not be available in all areas. The best source of information on current lease deals is your local dealer. Use the link next to the vehicle you’re interested in to contact a dealership near you.

Best Lease Deals:

  • 2021 Genesis G70: $329 per month
  • 2021 Honda Civic: $260 per month
  • 2021 Hyundai Sonata: $229 per month
  • 2021 Jeep Gladiator: $199 per month
  • 2021 Kia Soul: $169 per month
  • 2021 Lexus UX: $329 per month
  • 2021 Mazda Mazda3: $183 per month
  • 2021 MINI Cooper: $209 per month
  • 2021 Nissan Altima: $229 per month
  • 2021 Subaru Outback: $249 per month
  • 2021 Toyota Camry: $189 per month
  • 2021 Volkswagen Tiguan: $309 per month
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Car Deals: March 2021

We've compiled a list of the best car deals available in the U.S. for this month.

By Manufacturer:
U.S. News Best Price Program

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